5 shocking facts about heart attacks: you may be at risk

5 shocking facts about heart attacks: you may be at risk

August 16, 2019 1 By Bertrand Dibbert


Hi I’m D. Diane Cleverley, Personal Healthcare
Information. Welcome to this episode of Silent Killers. This week we’re going to talk about
Heart Attacks. If you’ve been following along on Google Plus, you know that my Pop had a
heart attack this week, but it was a silent heart attack, which is a heart attack that
doesn’t have any real chest pain or any symptoms, and it could go undiagnosed. This is actually
pretty common 40 percent to 60 percent of all heart attacks could be unrecognized and
that’s a really scary thought. Because these unrecognized or silent heart attacks could
portend future fatal heart attacks of a much bigger nature.
these heart attacks that are silent can occur in people who don’t have symptoms of heart
pain that’s actually why they become undiagnosed. So you don’t have previous episodes of angina
and some people don’t even have risk factors, so they are not overweight, they don’t have
high cholesterol. The symptoms can be very vague, they can be nausea, sweating vomiting,
they can be dizziness, and maybe a chest sensation, like a pressure, but not really a pain. So
if someone you know a loved one, is complaining about those kinds of symptoms, and you suspect,
if they are elderly, or they have some other heart problem, that they may be having a heart
attack, its always worth it to get it checked out.
Denise also asked me in the post, to talk about symptoms that women are more likely
to have during a heart attack compared to men, so a big meta-analysis looked at that
very question. And they found that women are much more likely to report things like nausea,
fatigue, dizziness, jaw pain, right arm pain, neck pain, and fatigue, then men were. and
they are actually less likely to report chest pain.
We were also talking about other demographic groups during the post. Speaking of other
demographic groups, when I was doing my research, I found out something really upsetting. I
know that a lot of the people that follow me on Google Plus and also on YouTube are
in Asia, a lot of them are Asian Indian, and of the Asian populations, people in Malaysia,
and I found out something really upsetting. People of the Asian Indian descent have an
altered gene for a lipoprotein a. Unfortunately this gene is risk factor for cardiovascular
disease. And this type of cardiovascular disease can strike really early. More than half of
the heart attacks and the cardiovascular disease in this population occur under the age of
50, and 10 percent of those heart attacks occur under the age of 40, so it’s really
striking the Asian Indian population quite young and in the prime of their working life,
so it’s causing a lot of disability and it’s cutting into the economy. And very unfortunately,
because it’s a genetic trait, its not modifiable through diet and exercise and lifestyle. This
population needs to pay extra attention special attention to those silent symptoms, the nausea,
the sweating, those things you don’t think of as chest pain especially if they haven’t
been having the chest pain. And also, you have to remember, it doesn’t
mean you have to be living in India. This occurs all across borders. It could be someone
living in the UK, or someone living in the US. Even those Asian Indians living in the
US have a 3 to 4 times greater risk of cardiovascular disease.
If you’ve had a first heart attack, you are at risk for a second heart attack is going
to feel just like your first heart attack. That’s not necessarily true. There are going
to be differences between the first heart attack and the second heart attack. For example,
nearly half of this patient population reported difference in symptoms of shortness of breath
between their first heart attack and their second heart attack. Women, in particular,
were more likely to experience a difference in their first heart attack and their second
heart attack, between shoulder pain, jaw pain, and nausea. And patients with diabetes, were
more likely to report a difference in chest symptoms. In fact, the sad part is, that patients
with mismatched symptoms because they expect the heart attack to symptoms to be the same,
are more likely to die. The very last special population I want to
touch on are athletes. There is something called Sudden Cardiac Death that does occur
in athletes. You’ve probably heard about it., every now and then that really fit athlete
that just drops dead on the playing field. It’s due to something called “Hypertrophic
Cardiomyopathy” . It’s a rare genetic disease. It’s really hard to detect, particularly in
young people and there’s usually a low index of suspicion because it is very rare. But
something that can alert you to it, are a family history of any sudden cardiac death,
if there is something like that in the family, you might want to look into it a little bit
further and ask your doctor if your young athlete should be screened.
I hope that this video was helpful and answered some of your questions that I found when I
was doing research for my own family and looking into things for my Pop. Remember, you deserve
to be healthy and well treated. Thank you for listening. And for more information,
please visit us on the web at personalhealthinfo.weebly.com