“Arming the Heart: Pacemaker-Defibrillator Returns Life to Heart Failure Patient” – Linda’s Story

“Arming the Heart: Pacemaker-Defibrillator Returns Life to Heart Failure Patient” – Linda’s Story

January 6, 2020 1 By Bertrand Dibbert


(Calming Music) My name is Linda Dolph and I live in
Waterloo, Iowa. When I was 39 years old, I was diagnosed
with cardiomyopathy — very hereditary in our
family. I have an aunt that had a heart
transplant, I had an uncle that was 42 years old
that passed away on the dance floor at their
25th wedding anniversary. My father has, my brother, and cousins.
In 2013, I was at the University of Iowa Hospitals
& Clinics seeing doctor Frances Johnson, who is
wonderful, and she diagnosed me with arterial fibrillation, so I felt very
fortunate because I was admitted to the hospital and Doctor Johnson was there, and I had a
whole staff and a whole team members that were taking excellent care
of me, answering my questions over anywheres from diet to what was going on.
After that, I was that a high risk for sudden death. She had me meet with doctor Michael Guidici in January 2013. When I first walked into
his office, I was so impressed. He listened
to me for about five minutes after going over my history, and said, “Linda, I think I can help you.” (crying) Went on to talk to me about the
pacemaker defibrillator and it’s a submammary implantable cardioverter defibrillator. And so the submammary means it’s underneath your breast — it’s on my right hand side. I asked and why he would recommend that He teased me that you could wear a
swimsuit and it wouldn’t be noticeable because the scar is not visible to the eye. And I had a lot of questions with, even
though I’m at high risk I don’t feel like I’m gonna die. So– and that’s the kind of information
that ladies need to learn, because there are other other symptoms for
females than there are for males. It’s just so important to get all your
options and all the information so you understand it more. I’ve never been in a hospital or clinic
before where the nurses will actually call and do a follow-up. Doctor Michael Guidici, after my first
meeting with him in January, I had a question. He was going to be gone, I emailed him, he even responded to my call. So you know, it makes you feel important
— you’re not just a number, you are a person, and they’re caring. The best thing about having my heart
care at the University is the quality of life that they gave me and the quality of work that they did for me. Your doctors are wonderful and all
your team effort, but you have put in effort into it, too. And it pays off well. (Calming music)