Del’s Story: Changing Seacoast Lives – Portsmouth Regional Hospital

Del’s Story: Changing Seacoast Lives – Portsmouth Regional Hospital

August 14, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


(instrumental music) (techno music) – My name is Del Record. I’m 60 years old. I’ve always been pretty active. I’ve skied since I was nine years old. I have a mountain bike. And I’m on the mountain
bike as often as I can. I’m an avid tennis player. I play tennis with my
friends and family here. We used to run, own, and operate
a Long Field Tennis Club. (heart beats) When I was 59, I had a heart attack, and I never saw it coming. (heart beats) (sirens) My wife and I, were remodeling the deck of our tennis club. It was very hot, very humid. And I attributed the
discomfort to the weather. The chest pain that I experienced
at the time was different. We called the Rye ambulance. They came to the house. The EMT started a line,
took my blood pressure, and decided that I best be checked out at Portsmouth Hospital. – The importance of time in evaluating a chest pain complaint
cannot be understated. Time is muscle. When you’re having a heart attack, the quicker you’re evaluated
by a medical professional, the more likely you are
to survive the event. – There was a doctor there
that conversed with me, and asked me about my symptoms. And, he said to me, “You’re
having a heart attack”. (light instrumental music) – At Portsmouth Regional Hospital we can handle all levels
of cardiac emergency. And we are the only hospital on the sea coast of New Hampshire that an Open Heart Surgical Program. – They put 2 stents in my heart. I had 2 arteries that were 98% blocked, so the blood flow wasn’t sufficient. I was in the hospital, I
think, for, 2 or 3 days. Then I was back to work
in a week, amazing. You know, I feel like I dodged a bullet. The prognosis is very good. I can continue a normal, healthy life. (laughter) (soothing instrumental music) – I’m very happy that he lives close. He’s only like 8 minutes away so, I like that I can spend
a lot of time with him. (soothing instrumental music) I mean it would be hard
not having him around. (soothing instrumental music) – Even to this point we can
still do things together, which is great. He’s very, very active, very competitive. Makes it fun to do things with him. Obviously, genetics play a
big part in heart conditions. My Grandfather passed away
behind where I’m sitting. He had a heart attack, on the tennis court that used to be here. My Father had his heart attack 150 yards to the left, right next to the other tennis court. The first thing I did was I went in for a stress test. I talked to my doctor and said, “I want to get ahead of this”. “What kind of changes
can I make in my life, ‘so that it makes a difference, ‘so I have more time to
spend with my family?” – You know, understanding
cardiovascular risk is an important part for reducing the mortality related to
cardiovascular disease. And those risk factors are very common and they include hypertension,
high cholesterol, obesity, family history
for coronary disease, Diabetes Mellitus, being the major ones. (conversing) – WOKQ, we are live this morning from Portsmouth Regional Hospital. It is American Heart Month. It’s all about heart health this month so, we’ve invited people into the brand new beautiful lobby here at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. Their getting free blood
pressure screenings, a free heart healthy
continental breakfast, advice from Dr. D. – The kind of testing we’re doing today is a cardiac evaluation including an exercise treadmill test. We’re doing blood pressure screenings, electrocardiograms, peripheral
arterial disease evaluations including an ankle brachial index. And, we’re doing some
nutritional counseling. – And we’re joined here in the lobby of Portsmouth Regional Hospital, brand new lobby by the way, by Mr. Del Record. Good morning Del. Welcome to the program. – Good morning, sir, thank you. I took time out of the day to be part of this event with the Portsmouth Hospital and OKQ because I think it’s really important to enforce the message. – All right, so now, down
the road, a year later, how is your life changed? – We’ve tweaked the meds a little bit. – Hm mm. – My diet is better. I continue to be active. I ski with National Ski Patrol. I’ve got, you know, 25 days in this year. I’m in the gym 2 or 3 days a week. You know, there are 3 things
that I’ve dialed into now, that I can categorize regarding my event, my particular heart attack event. One is diet, and family history. The other is communication
with your physician, regular check ups. I have a stress test on a regular basis. I get blood work done
to check my cholesterol. – We have everything set up here. You want to take another
stress test this morning? – Been there, done it. (laughter) No thanks. I’m good. (laughter) But I’m glad you did Everybody needs to. You know, that’s really important. You gotta stay on top of this. I never thought it was gonna happen to me ’cause I was, you know, bullet proof. – Thank you. Appreciate it. – The heart attack changed my life. I’m such a lucky guy. There are so many things now, that I was, you know it
sounds so cliche to say, that I took for granted. But, I did, you know, I did. It’s coming from the heart. You know, I mean this from
my double stented heart. My medically controlled,
pharmaceutically controlled, duel stent heart. (chuckles) The opportunity for me now to reflect and appreciate the small
things in life, the sunset. Again, this may sound poetically trite, but, you know, but, my family. I’ve always loved my family. My family’s been really important to me. But now, much more in focus. Much more in focus. I’m a lucky guy to have
these people around me. I love them very much. (soothing instrumental music)