Exogenous Ketones Metabolism

Exogenous Ketones Metabolism

August 18, 2019 11 By Bertrand Dibbert


Remember some of the big questions on
exogenous ketones are these: Do they help you lose weight? This is the second – I think second, maybe third – in a series on exogenous ketones. Remember some of the big questions on exogenous ketones are these: No. 1 – Do they help you lose
weight? And I think most people might agree that – not if you’re continuing to
eat a lot of carbs with them but that’s just one concept. There’s really more
debate around the concept of – Do exogenous ketones actually prepare your
metabolism – your mitochondria to burn ketones; to burn fat? Do they help your
body make that transition from carb burning to fat-burning? So, this is a
video that really doesn’t speak too deeply to either of those but it does
speak to the some of the general metabolism of ketones and it looks – looks at a couple of things: Esters versus salts; ketone esters versus ketone salts;
the ability of ketones to create ketosis – meaning elevated blood levels; whether or
not you just pee it all out; which is a good question and this
touches on that. The impact of a high carb meal beforetaking exogenous
ketones; and can you get a long-term elevation of your blood ketones? They
actually compared nasogastric tube versus multiple doses. So let’s take a
look: It’s Frontiers in Physiology 2017 “On the Metabolism of Exogenous Ketones in Humans” so there’s a lot of interest in human ketone metabolism due
to a recently reported benefits. Ketosis has traditionally been achieved by the
ketogenic diet or a low-carb diet but adherence is difficult and an
alternative way would be to give exogenous ketone drinks is what we’re
talking about here. So, ketone cells were found to contain 50% of the L-beta hydroxy isoform (L & D is like – D means right hand and L means left hand; and
that’s exactly what they are) You say, well, these two hands look exactly alike
but you know they’re different – they’re mirror images of each other. That’s what a D and an L isoform are. Why is that important?
Because ketone esters result in the D isoform whereas ketone salts result (I
believe) in the the isoform; I hope I didn’t get that backwards. Now,
here’s an interesting point about – do you pee it out? Urinary excretion of both D
and L was less than 1.5 percent of the total Beta-hydroxybutyrate
ingested and was in proportion to the blood concentration. So you hear that a
lot of people that are skeptics say “Well, yeah, you can elevate your blood levels
but you’re just peeing it out. It’s going into the toilet.” Hmm… This certainly would not indicate that that’s the case. Okay. Food lowered the dextro beta-hydroxybutyrate by 33% but did not alter the the other one. All ketone
drinks lowered blood glucose, which is very interesting. It lowered free fatty
acid and triglyceride concentrations as well. So, it – and it also had similar
effects on blood electrolytes. So, it’s very interesting. Also, you could give
three drinks over nine hours and they had the same continuous – the same basic blood impact as a continuous nasogastric infusion. So their conclusion was “We
conclude that exogenous ketone drinks are a practical, efficacious way to achieve
ketosis.” Now, I could go into a lot more detail on this – as you see, I’ve marked up
other components. I am NOT going to right now because those results basically
covered the issue. I will just tell you – you may be asking. So what was this study? It was called a crossover design. You give one group, one type; the other group,
the other type; and then you cross over and compare the results that you see
on each time beta versus the – I mean the salts versus the esters. The nasogastric,
the other, etc. Now, these were – this was a small study. There were – what? 15, 16, and 14 people in the study. These were young people (23 to 30 year olds), then BMI in the level of in the low twenties – 2/3 male; 1/3 female and,
again, you saw – this is the nasogastric versus three drinks over the nine hour
period; and there you go. What does – does that answer the question of whether it makes you healthy? Well, not really. But it does tell you – yes,
you can’t achieve ketosis. That is ketones in your blood. You can’t achieve
lasting ketosis, again, with ketones in your blood. Are you peeing it all out?
This would not indicate. So, are there differences between esters and salts? Yes. What does that mean? Don’t know yet. And the – again, that big question: Does it
train your mitochondria? Does it train your body metabolism to be able to make
that switch over to fat burning? I don’t think this tells you that either. In fact –
I mean it’s clear it doesn’t – but if you’ve made it this far, anyway, thanks. By
the way, if you’re interested, check out our website. We’re going to have an event
at University of Louisville Conference Center, where you can get your CIMT and
all your labs; and we’ll have a two day bootcamp experience going over all of
that.