FEMA Accessible: CDC Preparing for Winter Weather

FEMA Accessible: CDC Preparing for Winter Weather

August 18, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


Hi, my name is Alex Bruner. I am from FEMA, a close partner with
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also known as the CDC. This collaborated video provides information
on how to prepare for dangerously cold temperatures. Winter can be a fun time of year for most people, but it also comes with dangerous risks
if you aren’t properly prepared. This is especially true for those who live in areas that are affected by cold weather, snow, and ice. When the temperature drops below normal levels,
your body can lose heat quickly, and this can cause hypothermia or frostbite. Snowstorms can cause a lot of chaos
with icy roads and power outages. Learning how to protect yourself during
extreme cold weather and snowstorms will go a long way in preventing injury. Hypothermia is when your body has been
in cold weather without the proper protection and your body loses heat
more quickly than it makes heat. This is extremely dangerous as it can affect
the brain and cause you not to be able to move well, think clearly, or make good decisions. Frostbite also is another danger that can
happen if you don’t protect your body by covering it up in extreme cold weather. Frostbite usually affects the nose, ears,
cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes. If you don’t cover them up well,
they could be permanently damaged, and in serious cases, they require amputation. When a snowstorm hits, we know it’s a lot
of fun to go out and play in the snow, have snowball fights, or build a snowman. We just want you to be careful when you go outside, as you could slip and fall on icy sidewalks
and seriously hurt yourself. Make sure you are wearing enough warm layers of clothing, a hat, coat, gloves,
and a scarf to protect yourself. If you are planning to shovel snow,
it is important to know that cold weather can put more pressure on your heart and body
to keep your body warm, so work slowly and don’t try
to shovel all the snow at once. Take your time. Take frequent breaks. Hire a neighbor to help. If you overdo it,
you could put yourself at risk of heart attack. It is always a good idea to talk
with your doctor about your limitations. You should also prepare your home ahead of time in case you are stuck and can’t get out
because of heavy snowfall. You should have at least a week’s worth
of food and safety supplies. Develop a communications plan with your family in case everyone is separated during an emergency. If you have pets, bring them indoors. If you cannot bring them inside,
provide adequate shelter to keep them warm and make sure they have access to unfrozen water. Check on your neighbors and family
to make sure they are okay or if they need help. You should also pay attention
to your local news and officials to stay updated on important emergency information. Eating well-balanced meals will help you stay warmer. Do not drink alcoholic or caffeinated beverages
– they cause your body to lose heat faster. Instead, drink warm, sweet beverages or broth
to help keep yourself warm. If you have any dietary restrictions, ask your doctor. Visit CDC.gov for more information and checklists
of how you can prepare for winter weather.