Heart attack survivor, Mary Styndl, gets a second chance

Heart attack survivor, Mary Styndl, gets a second chance

August 29, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


(triumphant music tone) – On February 7th of 2014, day just like any other day. It was a Friday, got up
and got my grandson ready for school, and the only thing that was of any significance that morning is he wanted me to rock
him, and so we sat down in the chair and rocked,
and as I was rocking him, in the very center of
my chest, it felt like his head had bounced against my chest. My husband had been at
an early morning meeting, never comes home between meetings, but that particular morning,
I heard him come in, and call out to me, and
he came up the stairs and said, “Are you okay?” And I says, “I’m not feeling very good.” And I got up, and as I got
up, the pain got worse. He says, “Well, I’ll take you to the E-R.” He says, “Do you want to go to the E-R?” I says, “Yep, let’s go.” As I was walking down the stairs, the pain got just really, really bad, and I kinda sunk down on
the steps onto the floor, and I heard him calling 9-1-1. – I ran downstairs, and
she’s lying on the floor at the base of the steps, and she’s clammy. She’s hot. – And we got into the
ambulance, and away we went. They hooked me up to a 10 E-K-G. He knew already then that I
was having a heart attack. As I was coming in, I said to him, I said, “John, where are we? “We’re not in the emergency room.” He goes, “Oh, no, you don’t
get the emergency room. He says, “They’re waiting
for you in the cath lab.” Within a matter of minutes, I had two stents placed in my chest. – I got there. I met with the doctor. He said, “Yeah, we put
two stents into her,” but this was less than a half an
hour, less than 15 minutes since she left the house. – Supposedly, I was gonna be this perfect
patient, but they didn’t have any room in the step down area, so they put me into I-C-U. – As I’m standing there next to her, all of a sudden all the
whistles and bells go off, and the blue lights are flashing. The nurses come rushing in. – I don’t remember anything after that. – I’m walking down to the, ah, excuse me– I’m walking down to the visitor’s room where my daughter is, and she just went into cardiac arrest. – In less than 1% of all people that have stents placed,
the stents clog up, and I happened to be that 1%. – The doctor had come
in later, and told us that this was the vein that got plugged was called the widow maker. – As soon as I was stabilized enough, they took me back down into the cath lab, and basically, we laughed,
’cause they vacuumed it out. They told me I was a mild patient because I wanted to get up as soon as I could get up and walk around, because I knew I wanted to go home. For whatever reason God had decided that I needed to stay, and so here I am. – It was kind of like
going into the unknown, not knowing exactly what
you’re supposed to do. – I went into severe depression. It was pretty tough. I had had a doctor’s appointment that day, and I walked into the doctor’s appointment and she immediately recognized it. I started to cry, and I says, “I don’t know why I’m still here.” She said you need to stay right here, and she walked out of the room, and she came back in with somebody for me to talk to, and, you know… – I didn’t know how to react. I don’t know, she was trying to react to how I was reacting, and it wasn’t going well. We were just being negative
towards each other. We went and saw a counselor,
sat and talked to him, and the guy was amazing. I think it came out much stronger now than what it was even before
she had a heart attack. – Depression is a huge part of it, and people don’t understand that. It impacts your life as much
as the heart attack does. You start to question
everything, and you start to wonder when you’re
going to feel normal again. I used to sit down and set my pills up for two weeks, and it used to bother me. I knew that in my own mind,
I had to make a change, because this is part
of how I’m gonna live, and so I did. Having a heart attack has not defined my life, but it has now defined how I live. The Go Red is huge. It’s a symbol. You can go online and the
support is phenomenal. When my Mom originally had her bypass years and years ago, there was not such a thing as a stent. That’s what Go Red does, and that’s what the American Heart Association does. If there’s one thing that makes me sad, I’ve lost that security of what’s that pain. – You really need to
check these things out. Don’t sit there and allow yourself to sit back
and say, “Oh, it’s just “a small chest pain,” or you know, “My left arm is just a little sore,” or whatever, you need
to have it checked out. – I was 57 years old, and it
wasn’t gonna happen to me. But I found out, yeah,
it can happen to ya. And it can happen in the blink of an eye.