Heart Disease is a Serious Threat For Women

Heart Disease is a Serious Threat For Women

August 16, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


Hi! I’m robo-Suzie and today I’ll talk to
you about Heart Disease and its Serious Threat For Women.
Also don’t forget to subscribe for more tips in the future!
But back to our topic. Heart disease is the number one killer of
women, and research has confirmed that women are less likely to receive appropriate treatment
for heart attacks than men. Women are also more likely than men to die in a hospital
from a severe heart attack. A study by doctors at the Baylor College of
Medicine in Houston found that women were less likely to receive angioplasty within
ninety minutes after arriving at the hospital, less likely to be given beta blockers, and
less likely to receive treatment required to re-establish proper blood flow than were
men. On top of that, woman are less likely to have
Health Insurance in Texas to cover emergency care. Health insurance premium hikes hurt
women more because woman are less likely to be eligible for coverage through employers
since women are more likely to work part-time, have lower incomes, and rely on a coverage
from a spouse. One of every ten women who work full-time
has no health insurance coverage. For woman with health insurance, almost 16 percent have
been denied approval or payment for health care. Protect Yourself from Heart Attacks You can arm yourself with the knowledge of
how to prevent heart disease, what to do if you have a heart attack, and how to find the
best rates for Health Insurance in Texas. Does your lifestyle harm or help your heart?
You may need to cut out high-calorie and high-cholesterol foods and smoking, or reduce alcohol and stress.
Be aware that obesity puts you at greater risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol,
and insulin resistance, which is a precursor of diabetes. All of these problems increase
your risk of cardiovascular disease. According to the American Heart Association,
your total cholesterol should be less than 200, and your LDL (bad) cholesterol should
range from under 100 to under 160 depending on other risk factors for heart disease. Your
HDL (good) cholesterol should be 40 or higher for men, and 50 or higher for women. Triglycerides
should be under 150, and your blood pressure should be below 120/80. Research has also shown that at least 30 minutes
of physical activity five or more days a week can lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol,
and help you maintain a healthy weight. Even small amounts of exercise, like ten minutes
at a time, may offer some benefits. Studies show that even people who achieve a moderate
level of fitness are much less likely to die early than those with a low fitness level. Learn the Signs of a Heart Attack. Women can experience all or none of the symptoms
of heart attacks when they have an attack. Only an electrocardiogram (EKG), and a blood
enzyme test can confirm if you are having or have experienced a heart attack. It is
important to know for sure because a silent heart attack still damages your heart, and
lessens your heart’s ability to survive another attack. Insist on an EKG or an enzyme blood
test because it’s your life! Heart attack symptoms may include all, some,
or none of the following: Abdominal or stomach pain. Clammy sweats, heart flutters, or paleness. Crushing chest pain. Difficulty breathing and shortness of breath. Discomfort, fullness, pressure, squeezing,
or tightness in the center of the chest lasting more than a few minutes, or coming and going. Dizziness or nausea. Pain or pressure that spreads to the arms,
jaw, neck, shoulders, or upper back. Unexplained anxiety, fatigue or weakness — especially
during exertion. Heart attacks with a lack of symptoms (silent
heart attacks) often accompany ischemia. That means that plaque in the arteries has created
a long-term shortage of blood and oxygen reaching the heart. You are more likely to have ischemia
if you have at least three risk factors for heart disease, and are post-menopausal. A
cardiac stress test (a treadmill workout while tracking how well your heart is doing) can
detect ischemia. What to Do If You Think You Are Having a Heart
Attack. Call 911 and tell the operator you are having
heart attack symptoms. Don’t try to drive yourself, or ask someone to drive you to a
doctor or hospital. Not all hospitals can deal with acute coronary problems, and going
to the wrong hospital will delay treatment. The added stress of driving won’t do your
struggling heart any good, either. You may also need professional emergency personnel
if your condition gets worse before you reach the hospital. Chew of crush a full-strength aspirin, and
swallow it with a glass of water to prevent further blood clotting, and do as much as
possible to reduce the strain on your heart. That’s it! Thank you.
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