Heart Failure – April 2019 Quality Exchange

Heart Failure – April 2019 Quality Exchange

January 7, 2020 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


– [Michelle] Good morning, everyone, and welcome to the Heart
Failure Quality Exchange call. My name is Michelle, and I’ll
be your moderator for today. Feel free to ask questions
throughout the presentation by typing them into the Q and
A box on the right hand side, or by unmuting yourself by star six. The slides and a link to this
recording will be provided within one to two weeks
of this presentation. I will now turn the presentation over to our Regional VP of
Quality, Cherie Boxberger. Cherie, the floor is yours. – [Cherie] Good morning, everybody, and I see from the list of attendees we even have some of
you from Mountain Time, so thank you for getting up so early to join us on this quality exchange. Some of you may be new, we,
in the Southwest affiliate, and I’ll talk about that quite a bit. American Heart Association
is divided up in affiliates, and ours happens to be
a six state affiliate. And so we provide quality
improvement services across those states, so
that’s Arkansas, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Wyoming. And so, we decided that we
wanted to be able to have an opportunity for our customers
to kinda get some updates once a quarter, and also to be able to interact with one another. So oftentimes these meetings,
if you’ve been on before, I’m kinda beggin’ you to participate. But I tell you, that
little box, that Q and A works beautifully, and you can type comments and questions in there or at any point, just star
six and ask a question or share something that you’ve
been doing at your hospital cause that’s the point of these programs. This is the first this week. Today over the noon hour
the topic will be stroke. Tomorrow morning the topic
will be resuscitation at this time on Wednesday. The lunch hour topic tomorrow
is atrial fibrillation. And then Thursday morning
coronary artery disease. So we have these available
across the continuum of cardiovascular disease and stroke. If you want more
information on any of those, feel free to pop us an email at SWA, that’s Southwest Affiliates,
[email protected] So, anyway, let’s hop in for today. This is our agenda. We are going to kinda see how we’re doing after the first quarter. We realize the majority of people probably don’t have all of
their data in for Q one. But this’ll give us an idea. As you know this is abstracting
for heart failure can be a burdensome stone, so I wanna talk to you about the potential of creating uploaders. We have quite a few
hospitals across the country who successfully had
their IT department create a CSV file, that’s comma separated value. That’s what CSV is, file, so that some of the data can be
uploaded, and then you can just fill in the rest. We’ll have a wonderful heart
failure research update from my colleague, Kristi Esposito. And then I want to give
you a demonstration of HF Path, a wonderful
tool that you can introduce to your tech-savvy customers,
patients, and their families. It actually has a support group feature, so I wanna be able to show that. And then, of course, we’re gonna look over important dates that are to come up. So, and if there’s anything
else you want covered just pop it in that box and
Michelle will keep us on track. Now this is a chart
that you see every month because the concepts behind
Get With the Guidelines are to assure that patients are receiving guideline directed medical therapies. And as you can see, and these match up with many of the measures that are achievement and quality measures. And you can see from these
numbers that these have the evidence that they
actually save lives. They actually reduce readmission. And so, that is why we’re
always looking at your numbers and seeing how you’re
doing on ACE/ARB, ARNI. Are you getting those
evidence-based beta-blockers out, and why we’re actually
asking these questions. So we will always start with the evidence. And these are the things
that, among others, that we’re working on. And so, we do still have a good number of hospitals in our affiliate
who have not put data in, and I know as we’re wrapping up the year, and we were talking with all of you about your awards and your 2018 data, you may have gotten behind. If you’re one of these hospitals I would encourage you to think
about the CSV Uploader. We’ll talk more about that. Already we have a good number of hospitals that are on track, they’re
heading in the right direction to be recognized as high
performing heart failure centers. Here we are in our Q one data. And this is, of course,
only for a quarter, and some of you may not
have a whole quarter in. But wanted to be able to show you this. You should have received a report from your Quality Improvement Director. We, on a quarterly
basis, all the directors across the Southwest Affiliate
put our out-of-office on, and we run your reports so that you are on a quarterly basis seeing
how you’re doing so far and without taking any of
your precious time being able to see what’s going on. So this is what we were able to accomplish off the Q one data. Looking at 94%, we ended
the year on ACE/ARBS or ARNI from the Southwest Affiliate at 91%. And in Q one we are at
94% so an improvement. Also an improvement on
evidence-based beta-blockers where the aggregate for the
year was 90%, and we’re at 93. And you can see we’re
hangin’ about the same, very high, in LV function. And then that tricky and
very difficult measure, although hopefully we’ve
made it a little easier, the post discharge appointment
for heart failure patients who are aggregate for last year with 71%, and we’re at 81% across the affiliate. So we are really already hitting the road in a positive manner with
these achievement measures. Now you know your plus measures, and we didn’t include things, I don’t think we… Is it two pages, I forgot here. Yes, yes, yes, okay, sorry. So the plus measures, I’ll
be going through those. Now remember aldosterone
antagonist, although it is a quality measure or what
I’ll call a plus measure, it still is a class one recommendation. And so I’ve been really glad to see that we’re hitting the
year strong in that. We actually have some groups that are only focusing on aldosterone antagonists. They had to pick one
thing as their grade card, and that’s aldosterone antagonist. So it’s starting the year at 58%. ARNI continues to grow, and
I know that’s difficult. We reviewed last time the latest study that demonstrated that it is safe to be able to start
ARNI from the hospital. It doesn’t have to be done outside of the hospital after discharge. So that’s continuing to grow. We know we have such huge benefits that have been demonstrated
with that drug. Going across, DRTs up also. Not gonna read all these to you. Up with the follow-up visits. And for anyone who’s new on the call, just wanna reiterate
the difference between, and I’ll just go back there, the difference between this
post discharge appointment for heart failure patients
and seven day follow-up. Two distinct measures. The achievement measure stands alone, and it says that the patient had their appointment in their medical record at the time of discharge
or very closely thereafter that included date, time, and location. Follow-up visit within seven days. Again, stands completely alone. Did that appointment occur in seven days? So you can see that a
patient can actually be compliant in one or the other or both, but they’re not dependent
upon one another. So, two separate measures,
and that looks like we’re down a little bit,
so I’ll be interested if there’s any feedback as it relates to the seven day appointment. And let’s see, our
immunizations, of course. Most of you have that under control. Here we are on our honor roll, which, of course, the
different measure here is referral to a heart failure
disease management program which has a very specific definition. So it can be cardiac rehab. It can be 60 minutes of education. But it has to be a heart
failure specific program. So many of you on target there. All right, we are just getting started, and it is true that this volume is low. This will continue to
increase the n’s that we have. Anybody have any questions, concerns, things they’re working on
as it relates to measures? You can type them in,
and I’ll get over here where I can see them. Okay, anybody else havin’ trouble hearing? I’m hearing from my colleagues. I’m gonna turn it up here, I apologize. Maybe my headset is conked out. Thank you for the feedback, Sara. All right, let me just make sure, star six if you have any questions about measures. So I had a typo there,
and you’re gonna see it on all four pages, I apologize. Let’s go into CSV Uploader. The concept of a CSV Uploader is for your IT department to be able to go out to your EHR or if you have some other source of data, and to be able to pull in in the right format data, so that we can upload it in
to get with the guidelines. And you actually do this yourself. We don’t have to do it for you. When you go into the PMT, and that’s short for patient management
tool, then you would go to the section called Data Upload. And when you actually have your file this is how you’ll do it too. And then select CSV Uploader. And then in this tricky place, that’s why I have circled it here, if you click here, that’s how you get the document that you need to
share with your IT department. And it looks like this. And it gives coding instructions for your IT folks to be able to say these are the fields, this
is how you would format it. And the concept, let me go back, is that once you have that there, you would literally choose your file, decide what dates you wanna upload, and you would upload them. And say that you can
only get 10 or 15 things to come across. Date of birth, time of admission, some of the numeric, they
call ’em discrete elements. It would still be a savings for you because those are all things
you don’t have to put in. And because we know dates and
times can be slower to enter, just being able to upload
those dates and times could be a benefit to you. So if you are interested
in trying to pursue a CSV Uploader, I
encourage you to click here when you go into your own system. You’ll end up with this big document, and I forget how many pages it is. It’s a lot of pages. And the IT people will
be familiar with it. And talk to them to see what data elements you might be able to pull into your system so that your abstraction time is less. And we have this available for all of the Get With the Guidelines tools. So please, visit with your director, or if you’re not quite sure,
then ask [email protected] I’m sorry, I’m trying to
read messages and stuff. [email protected], and we’ll tell you who can work with you. But this is worth looking
into it for each of you. I am going to do a sound check. Some people are telling me they can hear, and some people are saying they cannot. Can somebody who’s not
an AHA person let me know how your volume is? Type it into the Q and A and
give me some feedback on that. Teresa, you asked, is this
something that’s available to all hospitals, yes. Now I will tell you… Oh, thanks, I’m getting
feedback that we’re okay. Sara, I think you may
just need to dial back in. Thanks so much. This is available to all hospitals. I will tell you that for those of you who are an HCA hospitals where that’s more dictated down from national, we don’t yet have a solution. Normally that has to be something that’s approved by your national office. But we have successfully used this tool with almost every other system. So, yes, Teresa, that’s
somethin’ that we can definitely work with. Thank you for all you
telling me about the volume. That helps me cause I was afraid I might need to log out and log back in. Any other questions about CSV Uploader? Is there anyone on the line
who’s actually using it? I know some of our partners,
Providence in Waco, finally got theirs
working, so I don’t know if it’s actually pulling in data yet. If there’s anyone on the
line who has done this, who might give a personal
testimony, let me know. Star six or you could just type it in and I can read off your comments. All right, well, I’m happy to hook you up with other hospitals that are doing this. Larissa DeLuna on our team, who is kind of our health IT lead,
really has skills in this area. So we have some resources for you. So let your director know
you want to pursue this. This is a good time of
year to get this working, so that your whole year can be abstracted with less time and effort. And, of course, whenever you can get your data in quicker, you’re gonna be able to use it for quality
improvement in a better way. When you’re not able to put data in in a timely fashion, then it becomes more of an award program where we really want this to be a quality improvement program where you’re making changes and getting the care for your patients improved. All right, gonna just double check. All right, looks like we don’t
have any further questions. Just so you know, give you an idea of what happens in our day-to-days, which was last week, is
that all the directors across the Southwest
Affiliate actually sent out last week 481 reports. I hope you find this helpful. If there’s something that you
would like to see changed, or, now we realize it’s always a snapshot, you’re not getting your whole quarter. So we’re definitely open to your feedback and would be interested to hear how you’re using those
and how it’s helpful or how it could be changed. All right, well, I am excited to turn the presentation over to my
colleague, Kristi Esposito. Kristi is not only the
director for North Texas, and she joined us last
fall, but she also has taken on the role of module champion which really means that she’s keeping her finger on the pulse
of heart failure research, what is going on. And so I’ve asked her to just share a few of the studies that came out of some recent scientific meetings, so that you can learn a
little more of what’s there. We certainly can have these
studies available for you. And if there’s something
you’d like to know more about, let us know in the Q and A, or you can talk to your director about it. So, Kristi, I’m gonna… I can turn it over to you, or I guess I can move your
slides if you’d rather. What are you gonna do, Michelle? Are you gonna turn it over to her? – [Michelle] Kristi, you have control. – [Kristi] Yes, yes, yes, I do. Good morning, everyone. Thank you, Cherie. All right, so, like Cherie said, I wanted to give you guys kind of some of the latest in heart
failure research and care that came out of both
our scientific sessions and then QCOR. So the first one, let’s
go ahead and get started. Sorry, I’m trying to figure
out how to move the slides. (chuckles) Okay, it said I have control, but I don’t, it’s not… – [Michelle] You should see a number with an up and down arrow. – [Kristy] There we go. Okay, sorry about that everybody. (chuckles) I’ve done it once before, and
it was in a different spot. So, okay. So this is the first one. This actually came out
of Scientific Sessions. And this one here, this was called Few people with heart failure
take guideline-recommended drug especially if not
started while hospitalized. Which this is something that, obviously, we probably already know. But I found this study
particularly interesting. This was a little bit of a larger study than the ones that we’ll
talk about out of QCOR. So I wanna give you a little
background on this first. So in 2016 the AHA and the
ACC issued a focused update to heart failure guidelines that reflected newer medication options. And that included ivabradine which has more recently been proven successful in helping to improve outcomes
of heart failure patients including reducing
rehospitalization rates. So this current study called Prime HF evaluated 104 patients. There was an average age of 58 years old. 36% were women and 64%
were African American. So it was a very diverse study. And these were patients
that were hospitalized across the United States
at 23 different hospitals who had worsening heart failure and who were obviously good
candidates for ivabradine. In the randomized, open-label study, researchers compared
rates of medication use six months later between those
whose hospital physicians were apt to initiate
it prior to discharge, and then those whose
physicians were instructed to provide the usual
care with consideration of starting the medication
during follow-up visits. So what they found was at six
months after hospitalization the researchers found that
patients whose physicians were asked to initiate it prior to discharge, they were far more likely to use it. It was 40.4% were still
using it if they were started in the hospital versus 11.5% for those that were not started
until after discharge. So those are huge numbers. Very statistically significant. They also found that they had a greater reduction in their heart rate, and they did not develop
abnormally low blood pressure or heart rate which has
been kind of a concern that some physicians have had as to why they’re not
starting it in the hospital and why they’re deferring
to after discharge. And they did not need to reduce their dose of beta-blockers either. So this is a really interesting study. Definitely as this medication becomes used more frequently, I think we’ll have a lot more data about it. But it’s important to realize that when we start our patients on ivabradine while they’re
still in the hospital versus waiting until after discharge that we’re reducing
those readmission rates, we’re not seeing that drop in
blood pressure or heart rate that there were concerns about. All right, so that was out
of Scientific Sessions. So the next ones that
we’re gonna talk about, these were all from QCOR. One thing that I do wanna
kind of say up front is with QCOR, these were
poster presentations. So these were typically
on a smaller scale. Typically at one facility or … So they’re all very, very interesting, and I hope you guys enjoy
them as much as I did. But I just want you to
kinda keep that in mind too that all of these, while they’re
a great jumping off point, we definitely would want to
pay close attention to these and definitely look for
more research in the future cause they’re a great start. So this first one here
is predictors of patient self-advocacy in heart failure. This is something that I
hadn’t really seen before. I’m not sure how well you can see that final model over there. But this came out of the
University of North Carolina. And the conclusion to this was that nurses have a direct relational role in helping their patients
use knowledge to speak up. And that wasn’t something that
I had really thought about. What they did here was that they looked at a patient’s social support as well as the trust that they had
with their providers, and the number of touch points that they had with their nurses
in the heart failure clinic in order to evaluate whether or not this made their patients
more likely to self-advocate, to ask questions, to share
with their physicians when they were having concerns. And I think that’s a really
important thing to focus on. So what it says here is
that the implications for the study is that trusting providers and social support is important
to patient’s self-advocacy. Interventions designed to
increase trust in provider, increase social support
and social skills may have a positive impact on a patient’s
level of self-advocacy. So I think the important
take away from this is just that for those of us,
you know, that our seeing our patients in the heart failure clinic, you are making a difference
with your patients. The touch points that you
have with your patients, you know, making sure
that they’re linked in, giving them… I know Cherie said that she’s
gonna talk a little bit later about HF Path and some
of the social support that they can get from that. And those are all key
pieces to making sure that we keep our patients,
not only engaged, but making sure that we give
our patients enough knowledge to feel comfortable asking
the right questions. All right, so this one here. This was another poster
board presentation from QCOR. And this actually was a local author. So this one came out of
the Baylor University School of Nursing in Dallas. And this was called Talk
to me about your medication nonadherence: Stories from
older adults with heart failure. So this was less of a study,
but more of getting out there, talking to patients. These were all patients over
the age of 65 years old. And really evaluating if they were taking their medications, and they were being completely adherent, as
in they were following the instructions provided
by their physicians or their clinic staff. And if they were not following
those instructions, exactly what some of those reasonings were. And it was really interesting. If you have time I’m sure that we can give you guys the link to go in and look at all of the posters from QCOR. There’s actually a search feature. But they have a lot of awesome quotes in there from patients. And one of the things that they found was that the patients that were nonadherent with their medications did not admit to being nonadherent, or they did not understand that what they were
doing was being nonadherent. They felt that they were just advocating for their own health. And so some of the quotes had things like, okay, well, if I take my
diuretic I have to get up to go to the bathroom
throughout the night, so I decided to take only half the dose. And the patients are like
that’s been working for me, so everything’s great. And there were a lot of
those type sentiments of, well, I had this potential side effect and I looked online,
or I did some research, and I felt really confident
that that was the problem. And so without talking to my physician I made the decision to
adjust what I was doing. And because they feel
like that was working, they would not classify
themselves as nonadherent which was very, very interesting to me. The other thing that they found was that they would not communicate with the physicians or with the staff that they were taking
it in a different manner from what they were prescribed. They also didn’t necessarily understand what medications they were
taking for which reason. Or even why the medications
at certain intervals was so important. So the conclusions from
this particular study is that assessments should aim to understand the actual medication taking routines and patient preferences. The development of interventions
that utilize resources that are readily accessible
to patients may promote decisions for medication adherence. So what that really is saying is just to have an open
dialogue with your patients. Be specific when asking if they’re taking their medication. Ask if they’re having any
particular side effects. Ask if there’s any problems
that they’re having. And make sure that we also
educate to our patients what medications they’re
taking for which reasons. And why the particular dosage
or frequency is so important. Okay, and this one here, I love because I get the pleasure of working with a lot of the heart failure clinic
staff around here in DFW. And so, this study here,
The Heart-Failure Clinic: Empowering the Armor Against
30-day All-Cause Readmissions. This here was basically just looking at whether or not getting patients involved with the heart failure
clinic after discharge was really making a difference. And if you look here at the results, I just wanna assure you all that you absolutely are making a difference. The study revealed that
there was a 67.1 reduction in 30 day all-cause readmissions following initiation of the clinic. And this was for patients that were seen at least twice in the heart
failure clinic after discharge. So this really breaks it down based on who was involved in the study
and what the findings were. But I think this is something
that a lot of the facilities, at least here in DFW, we’re very lucky we have heart failure clinics
available to our patients. And it really is proving to keep our patients engaged
and keep them compliant which is ultimately gonna help to, not only lower our 30 day,
all-cause readmissions, which is something that
everybody is focusing on. But it’ll also help to
improve the quality of life with our patients and improve their understanding of their condition. And I think I see that there’s
questions at the bottom. Oh, no, okay. All right, so that is it. Those were my fast and
furious top presentations from both Scientific Sessions and QCOR related to heart failure. If anybody has any questions. Okay, I don’t think I see any. Michelle, can you confirm that for me? – [Michelle] No questions, Kristi. – [Kristi] Okay, fantastic. Well, then we will turn
it back over to Cherie. Thank you everyone. – [Cherie] That’s great Kristi. And we’ll include in the email, there’s actually a link
so that you can see, that’s one of the great advancements in scientific meetings, is that now the posters are all
available electronically, and there’s actually a search feature. So we will send that out with these slides within a week of this,
and you’ll have a link. So you can go into those posters and actually type in heart failure, of if you wanna put in
a certain medication or you wanna put in heart
failure clinic or whatever, and you can look at those. Now I wanna point out
that many of the posters that were at QCOR, and QCOR stands for Quality of Care and Outcomes
Research Conference. It is an American Heart
Association Conference held each spring that many
of these posters were people just like you who
were working on a project, a process improvement project,
maybe a part of accreditation or part of your committee
with heart failure. And then they put that into
an abstract and submitted it. And each of you could
do this with programs or with improvement
efforts that you’re using. As I look at the list
of folks who are on here I know that, Amy, you come to mind there at St. Anthony’s in Colorado because you’ve done
some interesting things as it relates to hiring someone to help with your post discharge appointments. I know that the Baylor
Scott and White group is doing some things, so
Esther and that group. So I see a number of you
that are doing great things where you might want
to submit an abstract. And we would love to help you with that. Just so you know kinda what’s coming up. Heart Failure Society
of America, they have their own kinda Scientific
Sessions in that company. It’s not American Heart, but many American Heart people attend. The abstract deadline
for that is June 24th, and then their actual
program, it will be approved, or if it was approved, it
would be at September 13th through 16 in Philadelphia. The American Heart Association will hold our Scientific Sessions in November 16th through 18th, also in Philadelphia. I don’t know what the story is with that, but we’re all gonna go to Philadelphia if you’re gonna do a conference. And the abstract deadline
for that is June 6th. So think about what
you’re already working on. Hopefully as you think
about what Kristi shared, and then you go in and
look at the posters, you’re all doing this
kind of research already, and your colleagues can benefit from it. And especially when it’s in
the topic of heart failure. This is our growing diagnosis. It’s the most expensive diagnosis. And it’s difficult to
get patients’ compliance and engagement. So I encourage you. Your director will help you on this if it’s something you’re
not sure how to start. Just let your quality director know, or let us know at [email protected] that you want some help,
and we’ll sure do it. I also do want to remind you, any of you who did not participate or listen in on the webinar on February 11th. This is since we had our
last quality exchange. There is a fantastic heart failure webinar that includes all of our national leaders. I think four or five speakers. And I’m gonna send the link out also. So that’s a wonderful thing for you and your colleagues to have. All right, I’m not seeing any questions, so we’ll charge along. Michelle, are they gonna
be able to see my screen, or do I have to do something different? I didn’t think of that till this minute. – [Michelle] You will. – [Cherie] To show, to do a demo. Okay. – [Michelle] Yep, as soon
as you click on the website you’re gonna have to change
your Share preferences to share your Desktop. – [Cherie] Share my screen. And I’ve got it here. Okay, can you see that, Michelle? – [Michelle] Yes, I can. – [Cherie] Okay, so HF Path,
and I’ve logged in here, and we’ll send you the link. But this is a free tool. It’s a patient and caregiver tool. And I know there’s only certain patients that might be appropriate for this, but it’s a great place for
the tech-savvy caregivers to maybe help with a loved one. Because this tool which has been sponsored by Novartis, it’s really nice. Now I’m showing it to you
on a computer, obviously, but I would say that the app is actually, it’s super user friendly. It’s actually a little
more complicated online, but we know some people
don’t do phones and apps. The concept is like a
wonderful guided tour, but the concept is for
you to be able to create a plan, and what you’re
able to do with that plan is to be able… They’re gonna have a survey. Your medications are gonna be on there. So as you can imagine, this is something that you do, a caregiver
could do for their loved one. The things that can be
done are to keep track of blood glucose, their medications, when they’re taking them,
activity, et cetera. It also has a built in
quality of life survey so that we can be able to
see how they’re progressing. So when you look at, this
is kinda your standard, I forget which one they’ve
used, it’s at the bottom here. But where you can really
see how they’re doing in the past month. Are they having swelling? Are they having to sit up in a chair? Or they can’t get around the
house, so on and so forth. So that’s built in there. But what I wanted to show you, also, was that it has a monitored
support group feature. And this feature actually,
and don’t be alarmed. We actually keep track of what’s on there and we look at what’s
posted so people can’t necessarily, they can’t
give medical education. I do see there’s a drug thing there, but they’re telling how
much they are taking. So this is a good
opportunity if you’ve got somebody who is like a computer person for them to join and be able to talk to heart failure patients
across the country. And there’s some really
encouraging things on here. They’re asking how are
you doing with drugs. Somebody else was asking about CPAP, they just got CPAP. They’re looking at norms. So, anyway, this is something that where we in the hospital have
fewer and fewer opportunities to have support groups. This is something you could
get your folks involved in. And then like I said,
if they want to be able to keep track of their activity, like I said, this to
me, is much harder to do on a computer than it is on the app. Has anybody already used
this at all or gone in? If you’ll come off mute,
star six, and tell us how you use it? We’re gonna be using it in a
North Texas project very soon where we’re gonna be
deploying it with intention to a good group of folks
and see about adoption and how it’s helpful. Any questions or comments
as it relates to HF Path? Well, I encourage you
to take a look at it. Your director can also
help you get some materials so you can hand them a sheet that says how you get signed up, that kind of thing. It is available on the heart.org site, or we’ll have the direct link off of it. And it’s available in
the app store as well for Apple or Android. I realize it’s probably called
something else on Android, I’m an Apple, an Apple person. All right, what do I do, Michelle? I gotta get back to the slide. Oh, you did it, thank you. And I’m looking here just to make sure we don’t have any questions, all right. Give it a try. I wanna hear from you. And don’t forget about
Guidelines on the Go. Everybody loves Guidelines on the Go. Your docs will like it. And remember when you bring it up, you set it up for the
disease state you want, and if it’s pink, it means
there’s been a change. So it’s a great way to keep track when they tweak the guidelines. Usually you know if there’s a big change in the statements and
guidelines, but sometimes they just tweak or do some
sort of a focused update, and then you can find that
by seeing that it’s pink. It means you should check that out there’s been some changes. It’s available in the app stores. So it’s free, Guidelines on the Go. All right, important dates. The important dates we have coming up are May, very soon, it’s
tomorrow right, or coming up? So May, you will be hearing whether you are eligible for your award. We are gonna be notifying you
that in the next few weeks. And so all of you who get a recognition will receive an ad kit. Very important for you to let your marketing department
have access to this kit. In there is a press
release that can be edited. We do need to take a peak at it if you edit it more than
just adding your name. A certificate of achievement. There are little widgets
you can put on your website, your hospital website. There’s print ads that are really ready just to add your own logo. And there’s a whole
variety of the award icons, so that there’s things
that you’re wanting to do, posters and that kind of
thing, those are available. There are a lot of ways that
you can promote your awards, and I encourage you to do so. I’ve been doing this job for nine years, and I have seen everything
from a full-sized banner, and I’m talking from the
top of a building down three or four stories where they
announce their recognition. Obviously, smaller
posters in the elevators. Many of the Houston area places will put their awards inside their elevators. Lots of opportunities. Those of you on the
phone, how have you used, if you’ve been recognized,
have any of you done some clever things with your ad kits, or promoted in a way that
you thought was neat? Feel free to type those
in or just do star six and tell us what you’ve done. Well, I am interested. If you have pictures where you’ve used it, maybe this year as
you’ve become recognized. Show us what you’re doing with those. I’m gonna show you, just show you know, so we have projected that we’re gonna have 20 gold pluses, two golds,
eight silver pluses, a silver, a bronze,
and then 16 of the ones who have other awards will
also be target heart failures. So many of you are doing a fantastic job, and we want to get you the
recognition you deserve. And just so you know
your director is willing to frame your award and
come out and present it. The venues where we’ve done
that include board meetings, leadership meetings, even just your heart failure team meetings. So if you’re interested in doing that, we want to help you. Of course… Yep, go ahead. – [Michelle] Yes, we do
have a story from Shelly. So she had her city paper come out and do a whole article on the group. And they also brought in patients. – [Cherie] Oh, I love it. And anytime you can incorporate those patient stories, that is great. That is a good point. And many times you are able to get media to come out or a newspaper
article, that’s wonderful. Great example. Are there others, cause
we’d sure like to hear them. – [Michelle] Yes, they
also have Facebook groups for their hospitals. – [Cherie] Oh, well, that’s a good idea. So you can get that interaction as we talk about trust and some of those things, that does make sense to be able to incorporate that communication. We did hear presentation
two years ago, I think, at Heart Failure Society of America, how important using social media is to integrating with our patients. And especially my generation, I’m 55, the next generation of
heart failure patients where we are gonna depend
on electronics a lot. So, great, well, we’re interested
and wanna see pictures. Send those to
[email protected] and tell us how you promote your award. We’d love to have it. – [Michelle] Hi, Cherie,
before we move on, I have a couple questions
regarding the demo, the past demo. Just to clarify, it is
available in Android and the iphone store correct? – [Cherie] Yes, right. – [Michelle] Great. – [Cherie] And I think the link if you go on heart.org and in the search box put in HF Path, the page comes
up, and it has the link to online which is what I showed you, and then it has the link
to the Apple version and the Android version. – [Michelle] Great, and are
the patient’s input monitored by clinical staff? – [Cherie] Yes. – [Michelle] Thank you, Cherie. – [Cherie] It’s a monitored site. They will talk about clinical things. I’ve been on for the last month getting the notifications and just
getting a flavor for it. And you’ll see our coaches,
it’s called a coach. You’ll see our coaches intervene and say this is a decision to make by your doctor, please see your doctor. So you’ll see that by the coaches that are over to the right. Good question. All righty, I love this interaction. – [Kristi] So I would love to add that we do understand that not all patients are tech-savvy, of course, you
know, we hope that they are. Or that they have a caregiver that would be willing to do this. But there’s also a lot of
the forms from HF Path, like the symptom tracker
and all that, is also available in print form. A lot of that is out there
at heart.org as well. So if you have a patient
that seems interested in getting more education
or in tracking some of these things, but isn’t
necessarily tech-savvy you can actually print out
some of those forms as well to provide to your patients. So you can still have that open dialogue with your patient and have
them be tracking their symptoms and be aware of kind of what
to look for and all that. – [Cherie] That’s a very good point. Thanks, Kristi. So let your director is glad to help you just pop a note or [email protected], and we’ll get to your answer. So we’re hoping you’ll try to
finish your quarter one data. Be completely done here coming up soon. I wanted to remind you,
again, of those abstract due dates on the 6th and the 24th. For those of you who are
recognized as gold and silver, the US News and World
Report ad will come out… It probably comes out at the end of July. It’s actually the August
magazine that it’s in. Of course, in July we’re
gonna send you another Q two snapshot, the time
that we did last week. And then our goal, of course,
is that quarter two be abstracted by the end of August. So those are kinda some
upcoming and important dates. I think that’s what I
have, but we are interested if anyone has questions, if
you run into any difficulty in your abstraction. If physicians are asking you of anything that you would like this
group to weigh in on. Our Heart Failure breakfasts continue. We had one in Denver a
month and a half ago or so. Arkansas is moving forward
with their statewide Heart Failure breakfast. We’re about to reengage with
those of you in Oklahoma. That’ll be coming up pretty shortly. So you should have a regional
Heart Failure activity. I know the North Texas group
is kicking back off also. So make sure and ask your directors so that you can certainly be on the list for those Heart Failure gatherings. We want you to know your colleagues in your region on Heart Failure. Let’s see, I think I’m
gonna check my questions one more time, and then I’ll let you go unless somebody star six’s. All right, well, thank you so much for the hard work you
do improving the care for our heart failure patients. If you’ve been around these patients you know how sick they
are, and they really need guideline directed therapies. And you are the ones who are leading this nation and providing the best care to our heart failure patients. And as this population continues to grow with the baby boomers
entering the age group where it’s more prevalent. They’re really going
to need continued care and processes, clinics, methods to be able to take care of a large number of patients with as few resources as possible. And you’re really leading
the charge on that. So if you have any
questions or need anything, don’t hesitate to reach out
to your Director of Quality, that’s why they’re there. And we look forward to talking to you again next quarter. So thank you so much for your time, and I’ll give about 12 minutes back. You can grab some coffee
before your next meeting. – [Michelle] Great, Cherie,
and before we leave, I just wanna remind everyone
that the slides will be sent out within one or two weeks. And I do wanna share a comment
by one of our hospitals. So Shelly stated that her hospital started Get with the Guidelines Heart
Failure about three years ago. And they had a readmission rate at 38%. They are currently now down to 14%. This just shows the value
of Get with the Guidelines Heart Failure in helping
this hospital out. Thank you, Shelly, for sharing. – [Cherie] Oh, Shelly,
you’ve just warmed my heart because we’re gonna talk about awards, but that’s not why we’re doing this. You need to get this
data in in a timely way, so you can study what you’re doing. And it sounds like
you’ve done exactly that. That’s wonderful work. And I know there are many others on the call who are doing that as well. So let us know how we can help you, we wanna be your partner in doing that. So with that, we’ll let you go. Thanks so much. – [Michelle] Have a
wonderful day, everyone.