Heart Failure Coach: A Patient Engagement Game

Heart Failure Coach: A Patient Engagement Game

January 5, 2020 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


Engaged patient makes the best
patient I as a doctor can prescribe all I want.
In the end its up to the patient to really take the medicines on time to follow the appropriate life style, to contact us when needed. We have over 250,000 admissions a
year here and congestive heart failure represents
the number one, of all of those. And it’s it’s well over 5,000 admission a year. Some days you don’t feel good. Lots of people to get the heart failure. I was the same way when I first got it like eh, I’ll take my pills. Pretty self explanatory if you do everything right. But a lot of time people don’t. I think we’ve done a good job of telling
the patient about the disease and what is their role
in managing the disease but when you actually go and ask them afterwards have they’ve done, we find that there’s significant gaps. I think the Simcoach team has done an incredibly good job of bridging the gap. Because of the success we’ve had in driving sustainable behavior change with games and other applications, we wanted to bring our platform to patient engagement. Games are different from traditional education because they’re participatory. Games are designed to help us learn. In the game, players take care of a virtual
character name Simon, and help him reinforce three critical
skills related to heart failure patients staying out of
the hospital. And there’s been no better way in my experience to understand the
consequences of an action than to be able to play a game. When we first started to pilot the
game at UPMC we had some very early promising results. When we saw that patients actually did not return to the hospital as often
as we had seen prior to then using the educational
piece we actually said there’s something to
this, we’ve got to go deeper we’ve got to understand it. The gains in terms of lifestyle changes in terms of medication adherence and
terms of when to call us in times trouble seems to be a sustained effect. We’ve deployed this at various iterations for about eight months now and in that time frame we can seem to be sustained. And consistently, and I can say this without reservation, 100% of the my patients loved the game. The bottom line really is that this is adding value in terms of patient education. We wanted to work with UPMC because they’re committed to helping
their patients play an active role in their own health. I think it’s pretty cool. I like it. I think they should make everybody when they come take it. Well you know at this point in time in healthcare evolution, I believe that patients being in control of their own
health care is probably the only way we’re going to fix it.