High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

August 31, 2019 1 By Bertrand Dibbert


High blood pressure and pregnancy are not
necessarily a dangerous combination. But having high blood pressure during pregnancy
requires special care, regardless of whether you diagnosed with this
problem before or after conception. American Pregnancy Association says high blood
pressure affects around 6 to 8 percent of pregnant women. During pregnancy, women may suffer from many
types of high blood pressure, • Gestational high blood pressure that develops
after 20 weeks of pregnancy • Chronic high blood pressure that was present
before pregnancy or occurs before 20 weeks of pregnancy
• Chronic high blood pressure with overlapping preeclampsia that occurs in women with chronic
high blood pressure before pregnancy • Preeclampsia, a type of gestation complication
characterized by high blood pressure and signs of damage to another organ system. According to the American Society for Reproductive
Practitioners, The use of assistive technologies, such as
in-vitro fertilization, during the conception process also raises the risk of high blood
pressure in a pregnant woman. During pregnancy, you should retain a check
on your salt intake to keep your blood pressure under control. • Do not add too much salt to food when
cooking. Use herbs and spices instead to add flavor
to your dish. • Avoid processed foods, fast foods, and
sports drinks, which are high in sodium, even if they have no salty taste. • Avoid all canned foods because they are
often high in sodium. Deep breathing is a popular relaxation exercise
it helps to lower your stress levels and stabilize your blood pressure. 1. Lie down comfortably on your back. 2. Place your hands on your chest and under the
rib cage. 3. Inhale slowly through your nose so that you
feel your stomach moving upward. 4. Exhale slowly through the mouth counting to
5 while keeping your abdominal muscles tight. 5. Repeat 10 times and keep your breathing steady
and slow. 6. Do deep breathing for 10 minutes, Do this
practice 2 or 3 times a day, to control your blood pressure and keep your heart healthy. Inactive women have an increased risk of high
blood pressure during pregnancy than those who exercise. Walking is one of the excellent cardiovascular
workouts for pregnant women. Pregnant high blood pressure women can lower
their blood pressure by enjoying a quick 30 to 45-minute walk on a daily basis. It is a safe activity to continue during the
nine months of pregnancy. Potassium is an important mineral during pregnancy. Help maintain fluid and electrolyte balance. Potassium also helps in the transmission of
nerve impulses, contraction of muscles and the release of energy from carbohydrates,
fats, and proteins. A pregnant woman should target 2,000 to 4,000
mg of potassium a day. Some of the best foods rich in potassium are
sweet potatoes, tomatoes, orange juice, potatoes, bananas, beans, peas, melon, melon and dried
fruits like prunes and raisins. A diet low in magnesium can rise to high blood
pressure. That is why you should include foods rich
in magnesium in your diet during pregnancy. Along with lowering blood pressure, this mineral
will help to prevent the uterus of contracting prematurely. It also contributes to developing healthy
bones and teeth in your baby. The best way to take your daily dose of magnesium
is through a healthy nutrition. You can take magnesium from foods like almonds,
avocados, bananas, beans, pumpkin seeds, tofu, soy milk, cashew nuts, potatoes (with skin),
yogurt, blackstrap molasses, whole grains and green leafy vegetables. • Get ready for regular prenatal care. If your doctor says, you need medications
to keep your blood pressure under control, be sure to use it daily as prescribed. • Women who are at high risk for preeclampsia
may have to use aspirin in low doses to help prevent it. Your doctor will advise this. • Do not stop using any medicine without
talking to your doctor. • Smoking and drinking put stress on the
cardiovascular system and heart. It is also risky to your baby’s health. While pregnant do not use to smoking and drinking. • During pregnancy avoid caffeine, as it
has been linked to reduced placental blood flow and a risk of miscarriage.