Hospital admissions for heart failure soar to record levels of 86,500

Hospital admissions for heart failure soar to record levels of 86,500

November 6, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


Hospital admissions for heart failure have soared to record levels, damning figures reveal today The NHS admitted a third more patients for the condition last year than they did five years previously Admissions rose from 65,000 in 2013/14 to 86,500 in 2018/19 – a 33 per cent increase, three times the 11 per cent rise seen for other hospital admissions in the same period Experts believe Britain’s ageing and growing population is a key reason for the increase But other, far more avoidable, issues are also driving the rise. Hospital admissions for heart failure have soared to record levels, damning figures reveal today Stock pictureLifestyle factors such as obesity and poor diet increase the risk of diabetes and high blood pressure, which in turn raise the odds someone will develop heart failure And when people do develop the condition, GPs often fail to spot it, which increases the risk a patient will require hospital treatment Heart failure is a debilitating and incurable condition, in which the heart struggles to pump blood properly around the body It affects around 920,000 people in the UK and is one the biggest drains on NHS resources RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Blood test could detect start of breast cancer five YEARS Little Jaxon Jones could die without around-the-clock care. Share this article Share The condition is often caused by a heart attack, when the heart muscles become damaged, weakened, and unable to do their job In severe cases people with heart failure are left unable to walk up a flight of stairs and are often left breathless, even when resting A third of patients die within a year of developing the condition – a survival rate worse than many cancers Admissions rose from 65,000 in 2013/14 to 86,500 in 2018/19 – a 33 per cent increase, three times the 11 per cent rise seen for other hospital admissions in the same period Stock pictureExperts warn increasing admissions are placing a huge burden on the NHS Patients with heart failure stay in hospital for an average of 10 days – double the stay expected for other diagnoses – further increasing the toll on hospitals Professor Sir Nilesh Samani, medical director of the British Heart Foundation, which analysed the figures [must credit] said: ‘Heart failure poses a growing and increasingly complex challenge, not only for people living with the condition, but for those who care for them too ‘It’s concerning to see yet another increase in hospital admissions – an indication that how we diagnose, treat and care for these patients needs urgent attention ‘There is no cure for heart failure, but with access to the right services and support, people can go on to have a good quality of life for many years ‘We need to find new and improved ways of delivering this care, including in communities rather than hospitals ‘Doing so will improve thousands of lives and relieve the unsustainable pressure that heart failure is putting on our health service ’ Research published last year by Oxford University found GPs missed two in three cases of heart failure in the UK, significantly increasing their patients’ risk of hospitalisation and early death When patients did finally receive a diagnosis they were often left for months without follow-up, and many were given drugs at the wrong dose Only 36 per cent of heart failure patients were diagnosed by GPs in 2014, down from 56 per cent in 2002 It means at least 120,000 people a year are now diagnosed in hospital, out of a total of 190,000 diagnosed each year This delay can be a matter of life and death.If people are diagnosed by their GP they have a 20 per cent chance of dying within a year – but in hospital it jumps to 36 per cent