Hypertension 2015 Program Highlights

Hypertension 2015 Program Highlights

November 6, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


– I’m Mark Creager, President of the American
Heart Association. And I’m here in Washington DC at Hypertension 2015, our scientific sessions with
the counsel on hypertension and the counsel on kidney
and cardiovascular diseases. And I’m joined today
by doctor Joey Granger, who is the vice-chair of
the counsel on hypertension and the Program Chair for this meeting. Joey, this is going to
be a terrific meeting, tell us some of the highlights. – Hi Mark, thank you very much, it’s great to be hear in DC at the counsel on hypertension meeting. We’re having exciting three and a half day of scientific sessions, starting with our key note speaker, Dr. Gary Gibbons, the director of National Heart, Lung,
and Blood Institute, where he we’ll be highlighting the role of the National Institutes of Health in hypertension research. – That’s terrific. And I assume there’s going to be a lot of other great sessions
that are taking place. – Sure, the first day we have a series of sessions called Recent Adventures in Hypertension, which focuses on up-to-date information on both basic and clinical
research in hypertension. And we have some very prominent speakers from all over the world speaking on a variety of topics, for example, on the topic of environmental
epigenetics in hypertension, on the role of fetal programming in cardiovascular
disease and hypertension, and many other state-of-the-art research. – You know, this is
really the premier meeting for a hypertension, and kidney and cardiovascular
disease research. It’s a great time for everyone to convene right here in Washington. And you know, interesting, this week, by coincidence, the NHLBI, and Dr. Gibbons particualrly, anonounced the high-level results of the spring trial. A trial that’s likely to impact the way healthcare professionals
treat high blood pressure. – You right, Mark. In fact, I got an email
about the announcement that was made last Friday, and when I read the results of that particular
announcement by Dr. Gibbons, I was very excited. I think, everybody should be excited because it’s going to
have a significant impact on the way we treat hypertension, not only in the United States but throughout the world. And the finding showed that, it suggests that lowering blood pressure to systolic blood pressure treatment goal of 120
millimeters of mercury resulted in significant
reduction in cardiovascular risk and more importantly, 25% reduction in dying from cardiovascular disease. – That’s really terrific, Joey. Think how, once this will be implemented, how much it will favorably affect the American Heart
Association’s 2020 impact goals, which of course is to reduce deaths of a cardiovascular disease and stroke, as well as improve cardiovascular health in all Americans. – I agree with you, Mark. And more importantly, I think this shows you of
the importance of research and how research is going
to transform the lives of many individuals throughout the world. And even though the results, they are promising results, there’s still a lot of
research that needs to be done, because as you know, reducing blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, down to 120 is very difficult in some patients. So I think it’ll be important for us to go back to the laboratory and try to identify novel pathways for development of hypertension and come up with more potent drugs that will have less side effects. As you know, many of the patients, to achieve a systolic
blood pressure of 120 millimeters of mercury, they need to be on medications, three to four of medications. – Precisely. And precisely why we
are here in Washington to learn more about high
blood pressure research from our colleagues, share new information and then go back to our laboratories and test new hypothesis. Well, I’m looking forward
to an exciting meeting at Hypertension 2015
here in Washington, DC.