New Guidelines for High Blood Pressure

New Guidelines for High Blood Pressure

November 7, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


– The number of Americans considered to have high blood pressure
just went up because doctors and health groups lowered the
threshold for hypertension. KCTV5’s Natalie Davis
explains what this means for your health, and the
health of your family. – The idea is to flag the problem early on to prevent worse problems down the road. (air hissing) Marsha Davenport has high blood pressure, but she says her doctor
has helped her manage it. – She has, in a very, very huge way, and I’m grateful for that. – [Natalie] She’s one of
a quickly growing number of people diagnosed with hypertension. The American College of Cardiology and The American Heart Association have lowered the definition
of high blood pressure from 140/90 to 130/80. That means nearly half of US adults, 46% now have high blood pressure. – This will really change the
way our patients are treated. – [Natalie] Doctor Rachel
Sosland sees these new guidelines as a good thing. Earlier diagnoses means
earlier treatment to stave off more serious health problems. – Arterial damage and blood
vessel damage which can lead to dementia, heart attacks, vascular disease, kidney problems and vision changes. Some worry this will result
in greater use of medications but Sosland says that’s
not necessarily true. In my practice as a cardiologist I really focus on prevention
and now we can even be more proactive with our patients and try to get their numbers even lower. – [Natalie] She encourages patients to start with lifestyle changes. Cut down on salt in your diet. Eat more whole foods high in fiber and increase exercise. Marsha says it’s not
easy, but it’s important. – Diet is the hardest part but I’m getting there. – Get in to see your doctor. Know your numbers and discuss ways to manage your blood pressure. Reporting from Centerpoint Medical Center Natalie Davis, KCTV 5 News.