The Symptoms of Low Brain Blood Pressure

The Symptoms of Low Brain Blood Pressure

October 19, 2019 21 By Bertrand Dibbert


Hi, this is Dr. Nemechek of The Nemechek
Protocol ™ and I want to discuss the different ways that this low blood
pressure to the brain, the stuff I keep talking about that occurs with autonomic
dysfunction, can cause symptoms, alright. Now again real briefly, a very common
thing that happens when people have damage to their autonomic nervous system,
is they can’t get enough blood pressure up to the top of their head, against
gravity, when they’re upright. So that could either be standing upright, sitting
upright, or even when you’re walking around alright. This is called orthostatic intolerance. Orthostasis is the pressure your body feels, from gravity, to drive blood from your feet, and orthostatic intolerance means your body
can’t function right, and you’re getting symptoms from this. Now, one very
important thing is these symptoms tend to go away when you’re flat. When you
don’t have gravity (even with autonomic damage), it’s easy to get blood pressure
there, alright. Now, so one of the first things that people notice – some of the
most kind of intense symptoms they’ll have – is when they stand up or get out
of bed, and they’ll suddenly go “oh my goodness” they feel really, really
lightheaded. What happens is the pressure in the brain drops – FOOM – like that, and
they get lack of oxygen into the brain okay. They almost pass out. Now when it goes back they’re kind of relieved, but
typically the pressure does not go to normal, they’re still having low blood
pressure. Now this low blood pressure in the brain makes you very tired.
You know they’re, they don’t understand – they slept well, there’s no reason, they
don’t have any real illnesses, but they just, gosh, they get tired often – it gets
worse through the day, it kinda gets worse after meals, okay, because your blood pressure
will drop a little bit more after you eat, and in addition to that it can make
it so you can’t really focus, or concentrate well, okay. This is part of
the fundamental features of underlying, in say, just a simple teenager with ADD; they’re having trouble regulating blood pressure to their head, alright. And it
comes about from these physical, emotional, and inflammatory traumas (that I talk about in other videos), and that we are unable
to repair those injuries, okay – normally we should repair them within a few days
to a few weeks – we are unable to repair those because of this chronic inflammatory
state we have in our bodies now. So, you can have a little, you know,
lightheadedness “Whoa dizzy!” when you stand up and then it eases off. You might
be tired and you can’t, your brain doesn’t work quite so well. Now, one of
the interesting things is when that blood doesn’t get to the head it pools
in the legs of your muscles. So people are really fidgety. They’re moving their
muscles tap-tap-tap, they’re moving their feet, they’ve got to squirm in their chair a
lot, they can’t really sit down, they got to stay active, I feel better when I’m
busy – that kind of stuff. Some people become addicted to running, and those
people, in particular, will tell me – like, the only time I can think
clear is if I’m running – well moving the muscles generates, you get better
pressure in your head, better oxygen delivery to the brain, and your brain
works better, okay. Now, not only does the brain not get
enough oxygen but the muscles on the scalp, the neck, even in the jaw don’t get
enough oxygen because of a lack of pressure. Now in the neck, we call this
“coat hanger pain” okay, and this can cause intense tightness alright. You can get
temporal headaches here from your muscles. You can get it in the back.
Some people have tightness in their jaw, they’re kind of having to stretch their jaw it’s
so tight. And so, you get those muscles. Now, – those muscles hurt I should say- now,
the other thing that happens is your brain doesn’t particularly like this.
Your brain doesn’t think it’s a nuisance, your brain thinks you’re gonna DIE, okay?
I mean, that’s how biologically your brains supposed to keep you alive, and
your brains like “Oh my gosh! Not enough oxygen! We got to do something!”
So the brain learns that if you eat salt and sugar it’ll boost blood pressure
to your head. So now you’re kind of hungry all the time. Even though you’re
trying to watch your weight and avoid this, don’t snack on that, it…you just
can’t help, it’ll almost lift you up and levitate you to the pantry to get
some pretzels or something, okay. Why? Because the brain knows if they get
some salt or carbs – carbohydrates – it’ll boost pressure to
your head, and save your life, alright. Liquid can do the same thing so lots and lots of water. Some people are just insatiably thirsty – will boost blood
pressure to your head. Nicotine bypasses the damage, alright. That pack of a smoker, every cigarette drives blood pressure to your head,
every one. People think you have a nicotine problem really you got a
gravity problem, because when you lay down, suddenly that smoker doesn’t need
to smoke for 8-10 hours. It’s not really about nicotine – nicotine HELPS the
situation -it’s about autonomic damage causing low blood pressure. And then
finally when you don’t have enough pressure up there, and you aren’t
fidgeting, and you aren’t eating enough, or smoking, or chewing tobacco, or any of
those kind of things, the body releases some emergency measures that
stimulate the release of noradrenaline, and other kind of chemicals, to drive
pressure to your head so you won’t pass out. Now you feel weak and shaky, nervous,
anxious – you don’t even know why. Sometimes this is misconstrued as, misconstrued as low blood sugar – there it is, I
got interrupted there, I apologize. So, those are the things. From anywhere from just
lightheadedness to fatigue, foggy brain, chronic headache, neck tightness, balance being
off, hungry a lot, thirsty a lot, fidgeting a lot, all of these things are part of
low blood pressure and oxygen delivery to your brain. I hope you find that
useful, this is Dr. Patrick Nemechek of Nemechek
Autonomic Medicine in Buckeye, Arizona.