Type II Diabetes Explained

Type II Diabetes Explained

November 5, 2019 2 By Bertrand Dibbert


Type-2 diabetes has been known as a
black death of 21st century because it’s spreading exponentially around the world and has devastating health implications. More than 100 million adults in the
United States are now living with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Nearly 30
million Americans have diabetes and another 84 million have pre-diabetes a
condition that if not treated often leads to type-2 diabetes within 5
years at this rate Center for Disease Control and
Prevention predicts that 1 in 3 American will be diabetic by 2050.
Diabetes is predicted by a clear set of symptoms but it often goes undiagnosed.
The main signs of diabetes may include increased thirst and hunger, increase need to urinate, fatigue, blurred vision and slow healing of sores. If left untreated
diabetes can cause serious health implications including heart disease,
blindness, kidney failure, and lower extremity amputations. When it comes to
pharmacological treatment the first-line treatment in diabetes is Metformin. And
the second line treatment includes Thiazolidine Diones, Insulin therapy
and other specific receptor inhibitors When it comes to risk factors apart from
environmental and genetic factors most diabetes risk factors can be controlled.
The risk factors you can control are high blood pressure, high cholesterol and
high body mass index, especially if that weight is mostly carried around the
tummy. So, what’s going on in the body of a diabetic that is different from the
healthy body. Most of the food we eat is turn into glucose.
Glucose is crucial to our health because it’s an important source of energy for
our muscles and tissue. It’s also our brain’s main source of fuel. Pancreas, an
organ that lies near the stomach makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose
get into the cells of our body. Imagine cell wall has a lock and insulin
as a key to unlock that door for glucose to enter the cell. When you have type 1
diabetes your body doesn’t make enough insulin and in type 2 diabetes your body
produce enough insulin but it can’t use it as well as it should.
Being overweight is strongly linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. One
of the plausible explanation is the accumulation of fat inside the cells of
muscles and liver which interfere with the actions of insulin. In other words,
your cells have now developed insulin resistance. The fat accumulated inside
your muscle cells comes from the fat you eat, hence diet plays a key role in
prevention and treatment of type 2 Diabetes. Up to 90% of people diagnosed
with diabetes are overweight. These are the people whose body mass index is
greater than 2. The largest study conducted to compare the obesity rate of
those following different diet concluded that meat eaters have an average BMI of
28.8 it means overweight and close to being obese. Flexitarians, people who ate meat on a weekly basis rather than daily did better at BMI of 27.3. but was still overweight.
Pesco-vegetarians or pescetarians people who avoid all meat except fish had
an average BMI of 26.3. even Lacto-Ovo Vegetarians, people who
do not eat meat or fish but do eat eggs and dairy tend to be marginally
overweight and their BMI was falling at 25.7. The only dietary group found to be at ideal weight were one who followed complete plant-based
diet, whose BMI averaged 23.6. Based on a study of 89000 Californians, Flexitarian
appear to cut the rate of diabetes by 28%, Pescatarians by 51% and Lacto-Ovo vegetarians by 61%. On the other hand, people who followed complete plant-based diet dominated by fruits vegetables nuts and
whole grains appear to drop their risk of having diabetes by 78%.
Whole-food plant-based diet can be a great concomitant therapy when it comes to
prevention and management of your diabetes. The problem is you might have
eaten this way pretty much your whole life, and probably all of your friends
and family members too. You don’t know what else to eat. After all it’s a whole lifestyle change. At Holistic Health Support, we partnered with the well trained nutrition and health coaches, who have knowledge of
evidence-based whole food plant-based diet to manage chronic conditions. If you
or your loved ones need help to make a transition to the evidence-based
whole-food plant-based diet to manage your diabetes, we can help you to find a
suitable nutrition/Health coach. All you need to do is click on the link in the
description and finish the questionnaire and we will ensure to book you a FREE
appointment with one of our health coaches. We look forward to seeing you
there. Thanks for watching.