Via Christi Life Matters: Weight loss, heart failure and chaplaincy

Via Christi Life Matters: Weight loss, heart failure and chaplaincy

August 16, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


– [Announcer] The following
program is sponsored by Via Christi Health, a part of Ascension. – Coming up on Via Christi Life Matters, cardiac care is important for all of us. If you have heart failure, it is critical you follow the advice of your doctor. We’ll introduce you to
our heart failure patient who is receiving care through Via Christi’s heart failure clinic. Did you know that Via Christi
has a weight loss clinic? We will talk to a client who has lost well over 100 pounds and feels great. And we will talk to Dr. Newlin
about our suctioning clinic. All of this and much more coming up on Via Christi Life Matters. (upbeat music) Many people are thinking of ways they can improve their health. Weight loss is one of the more popular ways to make a healthy change. Via Christi’s weight management program offers ways to make that happen in a safe, medically supervised way. Now joining us on the program
today are Leann Moore, a health educator with Via Christi and Marty Magby, who has had success with the weight management program. Welcome to the program, guys. – Thank you.
– Thank you. – Before we get started too far, I’ve gotta recount what
you were telling me before we started the program. You didn’t even recognize Marty when he initially came in the room ’cause you were his initial contact with weight management.
– Yeah, correct. I was like, “That guy
looks kinda familiar.” But I’m like, “Who are you?” And he’s like, “It’s Marty, Leann!” I’m like, “Oh, man!” – He has such an impressive story. Leann, I do want to start with
you on our questions, though. Tell us what you do here at Via Christi and what your role is. – Okay, I am one of the Via
Christi’s health educator and I’ve been with HMR program since 1998. Took a little bit of break so,
but it’s an amazing program. As a health educator, I have a nickname as the inspirational drill sargent so, (laughs) I think I’ve earned that but it’s really exciting work that we do that we actually can help people actually make improvements in their health and part of that is
obviously, weight loss. So, as a health educator, I
hold them very accountable. We have a very structured program, so I coach and guide them and
put their feet to the fire and make sure that they’re
following the program, inspiring them, helping them get their exercise plan in place. Probably the thing that we’re best at is we help people become
master problem solvers because in the world
that we live in today, health is not supported
outside of the walls very much. There’s fast food on every corner, about 80% of the population’s overweight so there’s not a sense of urgency. So, we help people
understand the impact of how losing weight and getting
healthier and being active and watching your calories
and proper food choices, incorporating those fruits and vegetables, how that impacts their life
and the number on the scale. – Marty, when you walked in, I thought, you know, that’s not our subject (laughing)
and then I found our you were. (laughing) And you just looked
like a typically fit guy and how much do you weigh now? I’m just curious. – I weighted 185 this morning. – About 185 and what weight
were you when you started? – Well, when I started the program, I started in February, I was 340 and the last time I was
able to weigh myself was probably about Thanksgiving last year and I was about 365, so. – So you’re roughly half where you were– – Yeah, about half. – A year ago. – Yeah.
– That’s impressive. Tell us about your journey on the program. So, you got to a point where you obviously felt like you needed to lose weight. What was going on in
your life at that point? – So, you know, I’ve always been kind of that fat but healthy guy and so, I’ve always been active and my blood work and blood
pressure has always been okay, but recently, I’d had went
on blood pressure medicine because my blood pressure was borderline and they put me on it and that
was kind of a wake-up call. And then, obviously, I
didn’t feel great moving, I played tennis and I wasn’t
moving as well as I used to, so I did what I usually did,
I tried to lose some weight. And I’ve always been
successful at losing weight. I could lose 20 to 60
pounds relatively easily. Problem is, is then you plateau and then you’d fall back and you’d end up either the same or more
than you were before and so that’s the cycle that
I’ve probably went through, I don’t know how many times in my life. A lot. – What’s different this time? – Well, I think the difference is so, you know, when before
when I’d lose weight, I’d do some sort of diet plan that I picked up and I’d do that. Problem is, you can’t
live on those things. Yeah, you can lose weight on
’em, but you can’t live on ’em. And so, you can’t do that forever, you can’t do it for a
sustainable period of time that’s necessary to lose the
weight I was needing to lose so, the difference was I
lost a little bit on my own and I realized I was
at that plateau again. I actually had saw a news article last year about the weight loss program. I thought, “You know, I’m
gonna give this a shot.” So, I started and I had a
lot of preconceived notions about weight loss and things
and most of them were wrong. This really helped me learn
what I needed to do to make that a sustainable weight
loss over a period of time and not only from that, now, the idea of, I’m at 185 now, but I’ve been there for probably a month and a
half, almost two months, so the working now to maintain that healthy weight over time. – Leann, let’s talk about the two options that Via Christi offers. There’s a surgical option but then, there’s the option that
Marty was involved with which is HMR and it’s a
meal replacement program. How does that work? – And the reason why we
use meal replacements is because if you are trying
to navigate the grocery store, 80% of the grocery store is not food. And Americans have difficulty
with choices around food. So, the meal replacements
are super important because it gives them the structure, makes it simple, takes
the decision out of it, and I always tell the people that come in, “If you’re good at following directions, this program works really well.” So, it’s simple, it’s convenient, and the meal replacements
just help you on your journey to get that momentum to get the weight off because if you’re trying
to use grocery store food and you’re losing a half a pound a week, how motivated are you gonna be? They’re gonna quit. So the meal replacements
make the job easy. They come to class, they get
the support that they need, they have the inspiration
from other people that are in the class
that are losing weight. So, the structure of the program is what is the most important
and the accountability. Everybody that comes to our program wants that accountability. You know, I help at the
orientations, the intake process, and everybody that comes to our program has almost all of them have
tried 15, 20, 30 other diets. And so, we right from
the beginning say this is you’re on a structured diet,
but it’s a lifestyle change so we want you to recognize and embrace that right off the bat, ’cause there are a lot of myths out there. People who just think, “Well,
I’ve been going to the gym.” But you can’t outrun your fork. (laughing) So you have to change– – I’ve never heard that one before. I like that.
– Yeah, you have to change the amount of calories–
– That’s great. – That you’re taking in
and it needs to be simple and easy for people to follow. So, that’s what we have for people. – Just real quick, I’ll throw in on that. I was watching TV last
night and one of the shows my daughter likes to watch
is The Biggest Loser, which is a great show and I’m glad people are out there being successful, but they focus that show on the exercise, which is good,
– Right. But the reality of the situation, what I’ve learned, is if
you want to lose weight, you gotta focus on the food. – Yep, yeah. – Well, and Marty, to follow
up to one of Leann’s points, the accountability and the classes and changing the thought process, how important was that to you? – It’s huge. I mean, the accountability, I mean, I’m, I think I told her when I
was, I’m a rule follower. – Yeah, he is. (laughs)
– So the structure helps me. You tell me what to do, I’m
pretty good about doing it. And then, being able to, then having to every week come in there
and step on the scale and look her in the face and say, “Did I?” You know, ’cause the scale doesn’t lie. – Right. – It tells the truth. Did you do what you were told? I mean, so, I mean that’s a huge deal. – Yeah, interesting. Well, we’ve been putting the website up and the phone number number on the screen throughout the segment, so people, if they want more information, that’s how they will need to contact you to get that additional information and as we get ready to leave the segment, what final parting piece of advice would you give to people that, and I know we kinda hesitate to, we don’t want to promote, “Hey,
it’s January, lose weight.” But I think a lot of
people think that way. What’s the first piece of
advice you would give to ’em? – Yeah, we all have to start somewhere, so just, you know, reach
out, come to one of the free orientations,
learn about the program. I promise you, we don’t
do a high sales pitch. It’s informational. So, come check us out and know that the structure will work
for you if you do the program. So even if you’ve tried a
thousand different diets, our diet works because it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle change. – Perfect, thank you very much, guys. And congratulations. It’s very impressive.
– Thank you very much. – That’s all the time we
have for this segment. Stay with us. We’ll have more health
information coming up. – I thought I was taking care of myself until I found out I needed heart surgery. – I didn’t think I had heart disease. Then, I had a heart attack at age 36. – Today’s treatments offer more hope for heart patients than ever before, such as minimally invasive
valve replacement. At Via Christi Health, we continue to invest in advanced technology, bringing you the latest in cardiac care. – [Mike] So you can get the most out of the rest of your life. – [Ed] Heart care at Via Christi Health, because your life matters. – I love our Via Christi family doctor and I love that the new My Via Christi makes it easier to
manage my family’s care. I can send messages directly to my doctor, request appointments, review
notes from our office visits, order my prescription refills, view my lab results, and more. We’re a busy family. Thankfully, My Via Christi
is a convenient way to connect with the
people who care for us. Sign up at a Via Christi clinic near you. Via Christi Health,
because your life matters. – Via Christi’s suctioning clinic is helping kids breathe easier and it’s a great place for mom and dad to bring their children to
help with bronchiolitis. Let’s learn more with Dr. Philip Newlin. – Bronchiolitis is a common condition that actually surprisingly,
most every child gets. It’s a condition or syndrome of an illness mainly in younger children
of cough and thick secretions that mainly affects in a
greater way the children who have some sort of
underlying risk factor. We see this show up in children who are former premature infants or just the very young children, or if they have some sort of
underlying chronic condition, such as congenital heart disease. The way bronchiolitis
typically presents initially is like a common cold, no
secretions and some cough. But what we see is the
cough becomes progressive and can lead to even some
struggle with breathing or some gagging and
choking on those thick, tenacious secretions that are a natural part of bronchiolitis. There may be some low-grade
fever with it, as well. Where we become concerned is if the child develops some struggle with feedings, not feeding well enough and
becoming a little dehydrated, or if their oxygen level is low or just simply, the work of breathing becomes quite excessive. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot that can be offered to change the natural trajectory of this condition. Many people wonder about
an antibiotic for RSV and it simply doesn’t exist. Antibiotics should be
limited only to those that truly have a
complication of bronchiolitis, such as a convincing ear infection. What treatment is offered
though, is supportive care, which means making sure
a child’s well hydrated and that the secretions that
are inevitable with this don’t interfere with their breathing. So, we recommend families
at home use the bulb syringe to keep the nose cleared out, push fluids, and just keep a very close eye on the child’s work of
breathing and color. If you have a child who you’re suspicious that they may have bronchiolitis, it’s the best, of course, to have them evaluated by their primary care physician or if appropriate, based
on the time of day, perhaps an emergency room. Your primary care physician or
the emergency room physician who does the initial evaluation that leads to the
diagnosis of bronchiolitis may recommend to have available
our bronchiolitis clinic. This is a clinic here in
our hospital at St. Francis that’s open 24 hours a day. It is for children ages six
weeks to 23 months of age and it can be accessed up to twice a day for four days with our prescription. How you would access that would be to come to our emergency room
with that prescription and they will briefly register you and take you to the bronchiolitis clinic and therefore, bypass the need for the full emergency room evaluation. There, they will assess your child, take a look at work of breathing and hydration, check the oxygen saturation and do some of the suctioning to clear out those thick secretions that interfere with the
breathing of bronchiolitis. If your child’s struggle is showing itself in a worrisome way and it is felt that your child may even benefit from such things as IV fluids or oxygen to help him overcome this condition in a supportive way, then arrangements can be
made to move right over to our pediatric floor
area to be admitted. I hope that your child will have a simple course with bronchiolitis, but we want to be there for you so that those needs can be reassessed and addressed if your
child has some struggle. – A chance to live, that’s all I ask. – To have a healthier heart. To be more active. – [Helen] To see my great-grandkids grow. – At Via Christi, we continue to bring– – Leading-edge cardiac care to Kansas. – Providing new
possibilities for patients. – Including those who previously
had no treatment options. – Thanks to the physicians
at Via Christi– – I received life-changing care. – [Fred] Here, in the community I live. – Heart care at Via Christi Health, because your life matters. (upbeat music) – My name is Racquel Sanchez. I am a pediatrician for Via Christi Health at Carriage Parkway. I’ve been interested, I would say, since I was a little girl. I remember used to telling my parents, “I want to be a pediatrician
when I grow up.” You did such a good job! My aspiration for medicine actually came when one of my family members, a very close family member of mine passed away at a very young age. Since then, it’s just kinda
guided me throughout my career and I realized my calling
was in pediatrics. I enjoy working with children. I enjoy working with adolescents
and babies and toddlers, making a difference in their lives and promoting healthy living for them. Yes! Good job. So, working with children
has its challenges. I think the biggest thing for me, like when it comes to office visits, I definitely would want to make sure that my child feels very comfortable so that they’ll feel more
engaged in the visit and actually be a little bit more open. I try to get the parents
also involved, as well. At least that way, throughout the years that I see the patient, they’re a little bit more comfortable. Ready? One, two, three. My biggest goal and my ultimate goal is to give the best possible care I can and that they walk out of the office not just the patient,
but the family, as well, that they feel like they are
satisfied with their care and that they’re happy and then the patient is happy, as well. Gimme five! (slaps)
Yes! Communication’s a very important thing when it comes to medical care. It’s important that the
patients, the family members, especially in pediatrics,
and the physician create a team to be able to
find the best possible plan and management for a patient’s care and making sure that they’re growing and developing
appropriately for their age. One thing I do like about being in primary care as a pediatrician is that it allows me to have
that continuity of care. That way, the families themselves actually feel comfortable with seeing me. I really do love working with kids. One of the things that I
love the most about children is that I feel some gratification in that positive impact when they could just tell me a story and
that just makes my day. – I love our Via Christi family doctor and I love that the new My Via Christi makes it easier to
manage my family’s care. I can send messages directly to my doctor, request appointments, review
notes from our office visits, order my prescription refills, view my lab results, and more. We’re a busy family. Thankfully, My Via Christi
is a convenient way to connect with the
people who care for us. Sign up at a Via Christi clinic near you. Via Christi Health,
because your life matters. (ambient music) – I solemnly swear. – I swear. – That I will support and
defend the constitution. – [Woman] That I will
apply for the benefit of the sick, all measures required. – [Man In Green Shirt]
Against all enemies, foreign and domestic. – And with special obligations to all of my fellow human beings. – So help me God. – [Announcer] You honored
your oath and so do we. Via Christi and other Ascension doctors accept Veterans Choice. – Joining me is Charity Clark, manager of our heart failure clinic and Ruby Wright, a patient at the clinic. Welcome to the program, guys. – Thank you.
– Thank you. – Appreciate you being here.
– Thank you. – Charity, can you start by talking to us about heart failure? I think many people don’t
really know what that means. They assume it’s a heart attack, but it’s really quite different
from that, is that correct? – Correct. So, the heart doesn’t actually fail. It doesn’t stop. The heart is very much a pump which pumps blood out to
your body, carrying oxygen, which is important for all your organs and for your body to
function appropriately. And when the heart gets
weak or gets enlarged, then it doesn’t pump as effectively. It doesn’t get that blood or that oxygen out to your body like it needs. – Okay, tell us about
the heart failure clinic. What happens there? – So, at the heart failure clinic, we have a team of nurse practitioners, nurses, medical assistants,
and social workers that help surround the patient and really help the patient
manage their disease, learn about symptom recognition, who to call, help talk through what medications they’re
on, how to take them, how to weigh themselves daily, eat good food for their disease. – Mmm-hmm. Ruby, tell us about your situation. Why are you a patient and
talk to us a little bit about your care, how that works there? – I came to the heart
failure clinic as a result of having a heart issue
that was life-threatening and resulted in me having
to have some therapies and some redirection to get
back to a normal life again. – And what’s it been like? I imagine when you started,
it was probably pretty scary because you were going through
a challenging situation. How has the heart failure
clinic helped you? – They have a team at
the heart failure clinic that really understands the dynamics of what you’re going through, as well as be able to personally help
you through the situations and I like it because they don’t consider any question too crazy or any situation too difficult to be able to work through with you. – Charity, this is one of those things where I think it’s really,
to me, it’s quite fascinating how Via Christi’s approached
this and I think really good. I think many people, when
they have a situation, they go to the hospital,
they get a thousand different directions and instructions and it’s very confusing,
it’s overwhelming, you’re at a challenging time. With the clinic, people can come back, get help, get their questions answered, and really kinda get
coached through the process. – Right. We supplement the care that
they’re receiving from their– – That’s true. – Primary care physician,
their family physician, any specialist, so their
cardiologist they’re seeing. We don’t replace any of that. We actually supplement
it, so we’re an addition. So, what the cardiologist is doing, they’ve met with a
cardiologist in their office and been given that instruction. We actually then sit down with them, work with the patient to actually
see that they understand, answer any additional questions, also work with them on what their goal is. – Mmm-hmm.
– Mmm-hmm. – So, make it personal. What their goals are and
what their struggles are, what their fears are,
what their questions are, just really make that person centered. – Ruby, tell us a little bit about how that works from a patient perspective? – I like it because they
do coordinate everything. I don’t have to individually remember to tell my primary care physician anything or my heart doctor every
time I go to an appointment. They coordinate my appointments, they transfer information from one set of doctors to the other, and they relay to the
doctors, all of them, what my concerns are and what’s going on, and make sure that everybody
is in agreement on my care and I really like that. – Now, when you started the process and you would talk to the experts there, did they make you feel like you were part of the care process and had a say in what was going on? – Yes they did. They always took time out. They didn’t act as if
they were in a hurry, to make sure that I got my needs met, and that any concerns
that I had got addressed. – Great. Charity, tell us about how heart care has changed over the
years when it comes to dealing with patients on an
individual basis, like Ruby. It sounds like there’s so much more that goes into it than just patching somebody up and sending them home. – Right. There’s a lot of medications. I think around medication management, people have a lot of questions and just understanding that, understanding that unique for their care. There is the cost involved in medications that we can help with. There’s different programs. There’s rehabilitation programs
that we can help encourage and help the patients
participate in, as well. And I think that it is, it’s overwhelming when you leave the hospital. There’s a lot of information, just processing what the disease means. Also, how am I going to
make lifestyle changes in my life to help with my condition and it really has to be personal. – Now, we’ve talked about
person-centered care in the past. Explain to our viewers what
person-centered care is and how important that is. – So, person-centered
care is about the person. So, we talk a lot about what
their goals of care are. Also, what obstacles they face, what fears and challenges they
may have, and work with them. Not everybody learns the same, so we learn different, or we
use different learning styles. Someone may like, want
to read information. Someone may want to watch a video. Someone may need something specific, as far as we have a color-coded chart, so if you’re in the green zone or you’re in the yellow zone or if you’re in the red
zone with your symptoms and we customize those
charts and those care plans for the patient and their situation. – Now somebody has been
diagnosed with heart failure. What steps do they need to take? – So, number one is understanding
what the disease is. And then, understanding what
the disease means for them. And what the doctors have prescribed, as far as medication and treatment and then, one thing that we really want them to focus on is
identification of symptoms. So, when the heart is not pumping well, a lot of times, the body
will hold onto fluids. So, we talk a lot about daily weights. Weighing yourself every day so that you can recognize that symptom change and then, knowing what to
do, knowing who to call, and that’s one thing with
the heart failure clinic is we do have after-hour call
line and we are available, so if somebody’s just not
understanding something, even though they’ve been
to the doctor yesterday, we can get them in and get them seen, have them meet with somebody, review the education
or the new information they received from the physician. – Now Ruby, you look great. How are you feeling now? – I’m feeling really good. The help that I received
from the heart failure clinic keeps me out of the hospital. I can call them just like she said, anytime, day of the night,
and they do referrals for me and it just really makes my life a whole lot better as a result. – Perfect. Well, you guys do good work, Charity. – (chuckles) Thank you.
– I appreciate it. All right, that’s all the
time we have for this segment. Stay with us. We’ll be back with more health news. – [Announcer] If your loved
one suffered a stroke, would you be able to recognize it? To remember the signs
of stroke, think FAST. Face. When you smile, does the
face droop on one side? Arm. Lift both arms. Does one drift downward? Speech. Are words slurred or mixed up? Time. Time lost is brain lost. Call 911 immediately. Knowing the signs of
stroke can save a life. I should know. It saved mine. – Via Christi does a lot of work in the community outside of the hospital. One example is our Community Cares program where specialists visit
patients in their homes. Now, the goal is to keep these
patients out of the hospital and home, where they’re more comfortable. One non-clinical aspect to this
care is a chaplaincy program that brings chaplain care and
comfort to these patients. Via Christi’s Community Cares program reaches out to public
in a variety of ways, from home health visits to spiritual care from a chaplain for those in need. – We are spiritual,
emotional, physical beings and to have those things
work in harmony and have the, that’s the nice thing
I see about Ascension, is they see that the importance of spirituality in healthcare, knowing that it plays
a vital part in that. – [Tim] Tracy is one of the chaplains who works with people in their homes. One of his favorite
people to visit is Robert. Robert has a nurse who also comes to check on him on a regular basis. – That’s a great thing because I’m afraid of hospitals, anyway. (laughs) And makes me feel very, very good. They look out for me. – It’s a good program. They come out and check his weight. They check, make sure he’s
not on any new medicines and they take his vitals
and ask him questions and ask me questions. – [Tim] Robert isn’t the only person to benefit from the visits. Often, family members
who become caregivers are overwhelmed with the responsibility. – It takes a lot off of me. ‘Cause I’m worried all the time and it just takes a little bit off of me. I’m doing a lot better that way. (laughing) – [Tim] The visits help with the spiritual wellbeing of the patients, as well as social and physical aspects. – I stay in constant
communication with the social workers and the
nurses in the program and let them know how the patient’s doing from my point of view. – [Tim] The Community
Cares program reaches out to people all across our community. The goal is to keep people
out of the hospital and home, where they’re happier
and more comfortable. That’s all the time we
have for our program. If you want to see a schedule of future Via Christi Life Matters
programs or watch archived shows, you can go to viachristi.org/lifematters. Also, we wanted to remind you to pick up a copy of Via Christi Life magazine. It’s available at local grocery
stores and other retailers and you can find it at Via Christi clinic and hospital locations. Thanks for watching and all of us at Via Christi hope you have wonderful week. – [Announcer] For more health
and wellness information, visit viachristi.org/life. (upbeat music) This program was sponsored by Via Christi Health, a part of Ascension.