WILD RIDE Full Interview: Chuck Smith

WILD RIDE Full Interview: Chuck Smith

August 15, 2019 13 By Bertrand Dibbert


Chuck Smith attended the Healthy Life
Summit II in Orlando. He was – he came to us from the YouTube crowd and like most of
the YouTube crowd he knew his stuff but he’s got a couple of very interesting
stories. It started with his family history. He actually has some relatively
close ancestors that died in their 30s with heart attack, heart disease. The next
part was very interesting and a lot of action, more action than we usually see
on this channel. Chuck had his heart attack when he was commuting. He was in a Tesla going about 50 miles an hour and knew he had some nitro in the backseat
so he put the Tesla on autopilot to get him to the hospital while he’s looking
around for his nitro. So he’ll tell a little bit about that story as well. He’s
got – he brings some very interesting information to the table about vegan
diets. He lost 45 pounds on a vegan diet; cut the oils completely. Actually met a
couple of the hardcore vegans- Esselstyn Campbell, that crowd and cut the oils out
completely and again lost 45 pounds. So those – those of us who think that you
can’t make a positive impact on your life with with a vegan diet, that’s not
true! He’s made a huge impact. Now, second thing that happened though was he
noticed even after that weight loss that his triglycerides were up and his HDL
was down and his blood glucose was up. In fact, his triglyceride/HDL ratio was 5.
Just as a reminder, one is safe, two is danger of insulin resistance or diabetes,
and this was 5. He started listening to this channel and learning a little
bit more about that specific issue and decided he wanted to come see us at the
Healthy Life Summit. I remember meeting him and he told me that experience and
said, you know I’m an engineer. I’ve already made a lot of positive impacts
on my life but I think I can dial it in a lot more. So we’ve done a couple of
videos on with this interview. We had some technical problems.
I wouldn’t that – I wouldn’t suggest that you watch this whole thing. You may want
to plug it in while you’re doing something else and just listen but here we go! (Dr. Brewer:) Chuck has an interesting story and I
asked if he would mind sharing it and he said it would, so Chuck why don’t you
tell us a little bit about what’s happened with you? (Chuck:) Sure! I’m Chuck Smith.
I’m from Coco, Florida and definitely got cardiovascular disease, and I guess
it starts basically back when I look at my predecessor. My grandfather died, heart
attack in his 30. My uncle passed away when he’s 40 from a heart attack.
My dad battled with cardiovascular disease in our life at 2 open-heart
surgeries. First event, I believe when he was 40. Second event was in his 60s,
and he passed away at 70. So I think there was a pretty good chance I was going to have cardiovascular disease.
(Dr. Brewer:) Pardon me for interrupting but I am gonna will. That gives us a little bit of background on your family,
let’s get some background on you. We see a couple of – behind you and what does
that say under that hard hat, “Got Awesome!” (Chuck:) Oh yeah! That’s my “Got Awesome!”
sticker. I’m a electrical engineer by trade
and on a business, my major business here in Central Florida called Guardian
Manufacturing. We’ve got several – – manufacturing… and we do just the whole hosting thing. Pretty much
anything Dr. Brewer that a computer controls, we do. So it might be a – might be
a breathing Diagon Alley over Universal Studios. It
might be a – might be a launch platform Alpha Delta 4 pad out of contented Space
Center or it might be a – it might be an ozone system. Actually ozonate municipal
drinking water. The closest point around here is around
Sanford water when we get those on an oxidizer to provide a nice clean source
of drinking water to the public. So a little bit of a – little bit of diversity
there but I’ve been doing this now for about 28 years or so and it’s – it’s a
passion of mine and we’re a small company. You know, we got here about 60
folks or so and they’re doing it now and Disney for that point a year. (Dr. Brewer:) That’s an
interesting story and for the – for the viewers I’ll just share, Chuck mentioned
that he’s done a lot of high-tech work work with some of the rides.
We went back, Janice and I had a – had an experience on one of the rides where she
got pretty sick and Chuck knew exactly why. There is a little bit of what was it,
the disconnect between the visual and and the motion or what? (Chuck:) Actually a little
bit of catan delay between the actual motion in the video and the brain
doesn’t know like what to do with it so – a lot of people it makes them quite ill
and in Janice’s case, she got ill. And fortunately in that particular slide,
we’re able to solve that problem. You’re just going to define the analysis from
there and adjusting but yeah it’s – it’s pretty interesting.
(Dr. Brewer:) Our – our careers have intersected somewhat with the ozone as well. I used
to do, I set up a lot of clinics for Kroger in terms of the little clinics
for urgent care and obviously, I’ve done some TPS for hospitals. So ozone is a big
thing in both grocery and hospital work right? (Chuck:) oh yeah, Ozone to them. There’s
so many different things on, let’s use the lighting food safety. It’s a loss of a
lot in municipal water. They’re easy. The reason a lot now, in
general then although general facilities are using
or mouthwash and stuff like that. Although we’re not involved in the milk,
medical aspect of it. Uh pavones youth actually donated blood. It helped clean
up some things in your blood which means that your mind can accept those
interestingly. Three actually bringing it or on your body but what it
can’t, your lungs can accept through them so oh don’t talk to feet long so you
have to not pay attention to looking at your local for whatever you do. Your
body can tolerate it quite well. It’s actually some – well, there’s actually some
olive oils that you can ozonate use for some topical skin treatment. They work
fantastic for that. (Dr. Brewer:) So um that’s very helpful Chuck now you had mentioned that
you’ve – you’ve got a significant family history of heart attack, you want to get
catch us up from there? (Chuck:) Yeah so you know but obviously I knew there was an issue
and not only that add another one to the list. I had a cousin who passed away. He
was – I believe he was 57,58 and so there was no doubt. You know in my mind I
was like, hey when is mine gonna come right? So I tried to do some planning for that,
made some adjustments with diet, started digging into, you know, ways of reducing
… to have a cardiovascular event; and – and I thought I was doing
fairly well but obviously that wasn’t the case. When I was 54 years old in
December of 2015, I believe it was. I woke up one night. Dr. Brewer and I was – just had
a real tight, really weird feeling around my neck. I woke up couldn’t tell what it
was. My blood pressure is elevated, and with hospital and they looked at me,
checked my component levels. They do all the typical things for something that
might have a heart attack. And they said, “Hey you look pretty good!” And so I
went home. They sent me home the next day. My dental practitioner picked up on it.
He called me, the next thing he says, “Tell me what happened.” Well I got woke up in
the middle of the night but well and he says, I don’t like the fact that because
I think any distress tips and I think he did he ate one now. So I went, got one and
lo and behold came back and said, hey maybe blockage, we will deal with it. My
cardiologist wasn’t too concerned about it. He said, hey yeah but since it’s
poured into here, why don’t we just wait till the first part of January and we’ll
go ahead and take a look and see what we need to do? That might not be such a good
idea. On New Year’s Eve, well 31/15, I hosted yet I’ve sit in my office and the
entire office starts spinning uncontrollably; and fortunately my
brother in the office didn’t give any emergency ring. Long story short, all
night before probably 8 o’clock in the evening on New Year’s Eve, I had to
– spent putting LED. My LED was 99% block. I did not have a heart attack so
the good thing is I had no heart game. So when I got out of that situation, this
feel then passed if you don’t. Realize that you know how you impaired
the page that 99% blockage so when you get out of hospital, you feel like a
million bucks; and so that’s sort of where we went there. I did, I obviously
made some changes at that point. Then I went full vegan, vegan low-fat, no oil,
thinking that was the right way to go. Going under the pre-cancers I got my LDL
below. I think the number was 70 or so you know it would be essentially heart
attack crew so I did that. Got my overall cholesterol down to 120. I think my LDL
was 55 and then a short 2 1/2 years later, I was working out one day
and that’s been working out in 5 o’clock in the afternoon and then back
to my office and I guess, man I did not feel good. I’m like something’s going on
here but I think I’m just gonna throw things close so much stuff in the bag
and I’m gonna hit the house. So you’ve been reading the hospital. I
don’t know. I didn’t have any chest pain at that time, it’s just uncomfortable and so I
threw for some reason, this is such a crazy story but I always throw my
backpack in the trunk and after some time, after I spent, I always carry my micro
with me and I kept it in my backpack and I had – I always throw my backpack in the
trunk and this day I threw it in the backseat. And I was going home. I got
everything. For every mile I went down the road, I feel I mean he’s got worse
and worse and I finally came to point said, you know I think I’m having a heart
attack and you now what, suddenly the chest pain is coming in pretty strong; and so I
didn’t pay this piece but I’ve got a Tesla. So I put the test on auto truck. So
the cards driving down the road. I’m having a heart attack. I’m reaching
around in the backseat, grabbing my backpack. I pull the micro out, pull
it out, the micro tablets go all over the car but fortunately when I’m playing
the seats, I pick it up, pop the nitro. Well I never taken micro before. I’ve
had to admit thing’s I had an issue and never taking one so as you know it’s a
basil dilator and it definitely did the dilation and my blood pressure drop like
Wham; and so now I’m driving on the road, US one in the Cocoa. You know, 50 miles
an hour, having a heart attack till I feel nothing and at that point I
said, I’m not gonna make it home. I’m not gonna make it to hospital which by the way
it’s only like 2-3 miles down the road and so – (Dr. Brewer:) It’s like one of these,
you know, you hear that one episode, maybe more now where the – where the – the Google
driver wrecked and killed somebody. It sounds like it saved somebody, maybe
more than one. (Chuck:) That autopilot don’t mean. They say, I probably should have got off
the road a lot sooner but if you’re sitting up holding his parking lot, call
911, you can’t believe how hard it is to call 911 while having a heart attack. Probably most difficult
thing you’d ever done. Just fine, hit the buttons. I get speed dial a couple times
I finally got them and they can, they responded very quickly, lying on the horn.
hoping somebody would come help me. Couldn’t get anybody to come help me.
They were looking at me but because of the fact that I was lying on the horn,
I couldn’t even buy a helmet but Bard County Fire whiskey showed up, did a
fantastic job of getting me out of the car. In the meantime, while I was waiting
on them to come, you know, I really thought I was – I was that old you know. I
tell you what a heart attack feels like with elephant standing on your chest.
Well I had a whole herd of me standing on my chest; and I said this is good. I was
able to get my wife just a couple miles down the road where we live; and
holding a box. Okay you know sorry got a business, this wasn’t planned but I love
it here. She’ll bid the kids goodbye. And I thought literally at that time, I thought
I was dead but fortunately, got me my own, yeah I mean ambulance got me down
the hospital. It seemed like it took forever but I think a couple minutes and
then they had threw their way on me. When I walked in the door,
they started working on me and then the next thing happened that was really just
unbelievable is my cardiologist walked through the door and I’m like, where did you come
from? And he’s like, I just worked a 24 hour shift that we got him down the road.
I don’t know if they called him and how he heard about it. He just came in and
totally controlled the situation. Got me and he got me in the operating room and
I would say, Dr. Brewer, from the time this happened, at the time I had that
third spin, right above the first two that they had in my led. They sucked the
pot out and they put your skin in. I’m gonna say it was no more than 40. (Wow) The
great news about that is, my rejection fraction is still the same like at the
time I was a 56-year old male. So I didn’t have any heart attack. (Dr. Brewer:) No damage. (Chuck:) Miraculous. I
mean you got to clear out me that day or a lot of things lined up really really
like could’ve gone really really bad. So that’s sort of my adventures anywhere
with cardiovascular disease up until a a heart attack. And then after the heart
attack, it sort of been a journey of you to come up with an approach
that in my mind is an engineer’s whitneyhl statistic. You know,
statistically I want to do the best thing I can do with my health so that I
know that I’m doing everything I can do based on the data that’s out there today,
the way that we can. So that’s a sort of what happened. (Dr. Brewer: That’s a very interesting story. So just
a couple of clarification points and then take the story from there. So one
was, you were, you had 3 statins total and then your age at the time, 56? (Chuck:) 54 for
the first 2 steps, heart attack and a year and a half later at 56. Probably at 58.
(Dr. Brewer:) Okay, so let’s go up to, now to the present day. I remember when you and I
met that night, you said you – you brought up that engineer piece. You said, as an
engineer, I don’t want this to happen again.
You’ve obviously practiced a little bit of preventive maintenance and thinking
about that for your body which I wish the medical community would catch up on
that concept. Now, so you also said, look I’ve already done a lot of work and you
have. I would like for you, if you would share what you had done already and then
what what you’re planning to do next? (Chuck:) Right. Well it sort of went at it from a
bunch of different directions. And the first thing in you know, diet. What are
you eating? I had already tried the vegan thing so I went back and looked at my blood
work just say, hey well, hey what’s going on here? My LDL is 55, you know, I’ve
seen me having a heart attack and I did. What in my blood work that I have, stand out
and say, hey here’s the problem and that didn’t come immediately that actually
came about six months ago when I started watching the channel and a
couple of other ones on YouTube. And they started preaching the importance of the triglycerides, the HDL ratio.
Well my triglycerides, the HDL ratio, when I had my heart attack,
despite being vegan, this was important. I love the vegan place.
I love eating it. I love cooking it but with my issues, my – my triglyceride HDL ratio
was right at 5. Right at 5 and so and an interesting
thing is hearing, you know, my triglyceride is right at 150 right with
this quote from magic not sort of a high end. They said, okay my HDL was like
32 so you work those numbers and you get about 5. And I’m like that
sort of thing, so that was sort of keeping and the other one is – is what
should. And this was interesting because my fasting blood sugar is always
just like over a hundred. (Dr. Brewer:) Pardon the interruption we’ve got a little bit of fuzz in there,
and if you could repeat that there. So the first thing was triglyceride over
HDL, excuse me instead of having it at no risk of one or significant, maybe
significant risk of 2 years was it 5 despite having lost a good bit of
white on and diet. The other thing that you said, the second thing you said was
blood sugar. (Chuck:) I didn’t know about cardiologists a while back. Even before,
my skin, so my blood sugar on their high 102-103,
nothing to be too concerned about. Makes me feel deeply next time you there and
you may want to may all look further. So and they did! My CIMT probably
never been higher than six. Watch there’s never been over 102-103.
Hey guess what I found out last weekend to our blood glucose test, you know you
take that 75 grams of glucose and bam, your blood sugar goes to 177
in one hour. And then it comes down. In my mind, now that I know what I know,
insulin resistance more than likely, the primary causes are called my problem but –
but I was in a gray area. I was in a gray area, we’ll let you get picked up but you
know the traditional medical community, but in reality I’m extremely consumptive.
(Dr. Brewer:) Extremely what? (Chuck:) Insulin resistant. (Dr. Brewer:) Yeah. So I would agree with you. You’re yet one of
the another one of those folks that from – from a society perspective where a
little bit like that analogy of being slowly boiled by a frog, like a frog and
not noticing it, they say that that analogy is not a true
thing but it’s – it’s great for an analogy and it’s clearly what’s happening to us.
As – as a culture, we’re spending way too much time with blood sugar’s over 120,
and our doctor just used to seeing that. They’re used to to say in something to
patients, they don’t get a lot of response and then they just quit saying
anything. Yeah I applaud you for recognizing what was going on and
focusing on it. I think what was going on with you was – down on a vegan diet, you
can’t go vegan low carb but usually folks that are on a vegan diet really don’t
notice carbs at all and don’t think about them and you get a lot of carbs in
in a vegan diet. (Chuck:) Oh yeah. Oh yeah. No doubt and I you know I enjoyed the rice black
beans but potatoes, or the corn, all that kind of stuff and little did I know when
I was doing that I don’t know what my blood sugar was spiking out but I can
tell you it was specifically over 150. (Dr. Brewer:) Yeah I think it was too.
So every time it’s over, you know the higher it is and the more hours you
spend at those high levels, you got two things going on.
Number 1, you got a glucose binding to the protein in your intima.
So burning that intima and you’ve also got insulin up there and the insulin is,
number 1, shutting down your triglyceride burn and number 2, eating
up your HDL. So changing that triglyceride over HDL ratio. Speaking of
which, what is your – what is that ratio now Chuck? (Chuck:) I’m running about 1.6 right
now. I’ve got a triglyceride level of 54. (Dr. Brewer:) Wow that’s excellent and that’s – the 1.6 is down from a high of 5.
So is the 5 during the time that you, before you lost your
weight? (Chuck:) No but believe it or not, 5, I was probably maybe a little bit heavier I am
right now but not much. It was well the hot part, you why, I mean being vegan
loses the weight. I did lose the weight. I’ve brought my BMI – (Dr Brewer:) How much idid you lose?
(Chuck:) Well yeah I bought these pictures. Here’s a picture of me back about, I
don’t know about when I was 42, 43. I’m in the center there. I weigh 215
pounds. (Dr. Brewer:) How much do you weigh now? (Chuck:) 107. (Dr. Brewer:) Wow so what 45 pounds?
(Chuck:) Correct. (Dr. Brewer:) How tall are you? (Chuck:) 5′ 9″. (Dr. Brewer:) So that’s a –
that’s a major major weight loss and you did that on vegan so… (Chuck:) and you know the
interesting thing is like I saw this more interesting that after this
weekend, you know, Pammy you know she weighs about 110 pounds,
soaking wet. She loves holy pancakes. There’s a maple syrup and I’ve been
after it, saying you know I don’t know you ought to be deep you know and she
said, well let’s do it! Dr. Brewer said let’s try the big blood sugar test on
Saturday morning. So this morning we measure the blood sugar. Her fasting
blood she was 85. She ate the pancakes. 3 of them. Well not a ton of syrup but
a little bit of maple syrup. From blood sugar peak probably a little bit over a
hundred. More than two hours back in the mind. (Dr. Brewer:) It does?
(Chuck:) Yes it does. The moral of the story is, you know she can, she
can probably eat those pancakes for the rest of her life as long as she thinks
her blood sugar isn’t that high up, right? I mean it’s just – I’m – I’m obviously, I’m not made
that way I wish I was. I can’t believe I did that. I don’t even
know. (Dr. Brewer:) Yeah I – I can eat a fairly low carb meal and still get a bump up in
over 140/160. If I eat bread, certainly pancakes, even you know they say well
hold weight is very healthy. I mean it may be very healthy and it may be slower
to – to generate that hyperglycemia but it still. Mine goes up 160/180 and it
takes a couple of hours if I don’t do something. (Chuck:) Yeah and the way I got mine down,
the numbers down or my triglycerides ratio down was, you know basically adopt in the diet
that – I was in low carb. I would say I’m not necessarily doing keto per. And
occasionally, I’m struggling into ketosis but I would say on most days, I’m
consuming somewhere between 50 and maybe 80, 90 grams of carbs. You know I’m doing some
intermittent fasting when I don’t eat in the morning. Might have a cup of coffee, .. to tea with an
octane oil in it and … once. You know, small lunch and then dinner. That
seems to work. I mean I feel a lot better.
I’ve gained quite a bit of muscle mass as the adult Bobby and I think that’s
going to be the – that’s the body plan. I’m like oh that’s not actually a diet.
I mean it’s a lifestyle I guess but I plan on… (Dr. Brewer:) You bring up a couple of
really good distinction. Number 1, the the best diet’s not a diet. It’s a changed
lifestyle eating plan. The – the other thing is, you bring up some interesting
perspective about this confusion between and this debate between plant-based and
low-carb and keto. You know it’s unfortunate. I think a lot
of us continue to die because we hear, well keto is good, plant-based is good. All
of these are good and we really don’t focus on what’s – what’s going on with our
body and respond to it. You did a great job in terms of losing 45 pounds on a – on
a vegan diet so I would clearly give you kudos in that vegan diet kudos for
getting you there! But you didn’t stop there. You were smart enough to think,
okay you know what is there anything else I need to be fine-tuning and then
sure enough you found out that your body was spending hours probably hours of
every day. What probably up 160, 170, 180 because the – the carbs in a – and people
say, well OGTT is geared to fail. And OGTT has 75 grams of glucose and
that’s about the amount of sugars you’re gonna find in a large coat. Not even a
jumbo and certainly nowhere near a big gulp. It’s a little – yeah it’s a faster
hit to the blood sugar than – than whole wheat pancakes. Not a faster hit than
whole wheat pancakes with syrups. So we’re – that’s no more, the OGTT is really no
more geared to – to make us fail than the diet that we’re eating on a regular
basis in this country. We had some good discussion about – about that at the event.
One of our attendees had actually just come in from a vegan diet cruise. He was
still trying to make his mind up and I think at the the end of the day, he – this
is what he told me. He said, you know what I think, all of yours, there’s a major
overlap with what almost all of what you’re saying and that is vegan versus something else
is – is not some – maybe not quite so much. The
difference. There – there’s a major common ground where you’re both saying, look
watch for hypoglycemia. Stay away from glycemic foods. Now you get the guys that
are ketogenic on one end of the spectrum and they just want to eat tons and tons
of animal fats. I’m not that way. I – I agree with you. We tend to stay a little
bit ketogenic as long as we’re keeping our weight down. Then you get, maybe I
think S. Holstein and Campbell both would both, would say no, never have any fats or
oils even – or even plant-based and actually I think you’ve you’ve talked to some folks
in that camp. I don’t think that that’s that well-supported these days with the
new research. I think one of the major things we need to to make sure,
especially as we hit our 50s and 60s is that, our body’s not spending hours every
day up in the 160s, 180s in terms of glucose. Yeah and I don’t think it’s a
once punch, one size fits all either. Right. You know for me it just didn’t work. For
somebody else that may work just fine. There’s a common thread between them
though. It’s been lack of process. All those guys you just mentioned, the
lifestyle you mentioned deal with I’m not teasing them phosphates and get rid of
that own little thing we’re arguing about really making some preventable
penalty for the most part, because I still need a lot of expertise. I eat tons of
broccoli, and bulky sprout, cauliflower and nuts. You see if I’ve been quite fat?
I still do quite a bit of plant-based but it is along with some healthy fats and
along with a little bit of protein and probably good insulin. (Dr. Brewer:) Yeah uh
actually again, I think these diets are a lot closer for those of us and
unfortunately, it’s in the majority, once you get into the 60s, those of us who do
have developed some insulin resistance. I think that’s the opportunity that we
have as a culture and a society and that is to recognize how many of us are
getting insulin-resistant as we get older. We’re just not recognizing. Like
you said, your wife is not gonna have any problems. At least right now and until
maybe she has a few more years with carbs. (Chuck:) You said something
interesting this past weekend about which came first then some existing for
the weight gain. And I’m of the opinion that the insulin resistance, if you develop
this insulin resistance and then the waiting football, I mean that sort of makes sense
to me and I think in my case that’s what happened when I just went back. And then
when I look back at to my dad, same kind of thing. He matched up the exact same
way. (Dr. Brewer:) You got – you got my message. That was – that was exactly the point and actually
I didn’t come up with that. I got that from reading Gary Taps. You know why we get
fat and what to do about it. And several other authors have said the same thing.
They say, you know what, we expect people to get a middle-age spread. That’s why
they call it the middle-age spread. We just get heavier and we also expect them
to get insulin resistance, at least the docs do but as we’ve discussed don’t
really focus too much on them. Well why do you – why do you get that middle-age
spread? Is it simply because your – your gender related hormones aren’t –
aren’t cooking along, your basal metabolic rate is not going as fast? I
don’t think so. I think we – as we start getting insulin resistant, our blood
sugar starts doing this and then as our blood sugar starts doing this, you – you’re
up here at 160 you dip down to 80 and you get you get some hunger reaction to
that. You start cooking along with a high basal insulin and it’s just easier to
eat, makes you hungry. (Chuck:) Well that’s the – I guess the other thing happening about,
what you know what other things am I doing? I have some other stuff
besides the lifestyle of those can come to me. Exercising is the big part. Right talk
about that. What I do right now, I walk I try to walk. I don’t do it every day but
I get about 5 times a week. 2-mile walk at a brisk pace about a 14-15
minute a mile. That helps. I’ve been doing that for a while. I do
resistance weight training. I found this one I really like it’s called X3 – X03
bar and it’s a quick 15, 10-15-minute workout that concentrates on this
resistance like playing a big rubber band. That works well and then what I’ve
done recently within the last 3 months is I’ve incorporated a 20-minute
HIIT workout that you recommended. I’ve got a skeleton bike and they’ve got a
hip poking them up and that has really – that has really helped me on my glucose
level. Like you say I try to do it every other day. I don’t have to do it every
day, every 48 hours I try to get anything. I’m not perfectly fit but it’s working out pretty good.
(Dr. Brewer:) So yeah I’m glad you mentioned that because say that again. That and let me clarify.
So the research, the medical science would indicate that if somebody does
resistance training or HIIT (High-Intensity Interval Training)
especially with the large muscles in the leg, hips, and back, it’s almost like a
long-acting insulin. It tends to drop your blood sugar and it tends to make
your body, your muscles more reactive to insulin, less resistant to insulin. So I
tend to see that as well. If I drop my HIIT training, it becomes a little bit
more difficult for me to handle the same meal that I had when I’m – when I’m doing
it. So what – could you repeat what you – what you were saying? You said it’s – you
manage your glucose a lot better when you’re doing that ? (Chuck:) Yeah I do and I just
found with that 20-minute HIIT, my glucose will seem to be more stabilized. Maybe
the baseline’s a little bit lower. I feel better for sure.
I definitely develop some lower – lower body strength and that kind
of math like you said it doesn’t have to be done everyday. It’s not like this…
It’s – it’s 20 minutes. Now it is 20 minutes as you say, it’s time. I mean
you’re getting to point we can’t pause. Their breathing, my heart and I didn’t
wear a heart rate monitor. I’ve got it nice when it wears on my forearm and
I’ll get my heart rate up – I don’t like it to go over 130, 135 but it gets up in
the 120s and stays there for a good solid 10-12 minutes and you know when
you’re done, you’re – you got a good sweat worked up and I think it worked. (Dr. Brewer:) For me it
dropped my basal glucose right but it also, more than that it really tends
to cut the top off of the post prandial the stuff, the peaks after the eating.
They – they go up a lot less and they come back down a lot quicker. Chuck there’s
one other thing I wanted to ask you about. In the event you shared with folks
that you have a glucometer and CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter). Would you
mind sharing a little bit about that with the viewers? (Chuck:) Yeah you know – you know
after listening that you talked about insulin resistance and how important it is,
and watching that level that 120 not letting that glucose over 120, I
started doing finger playful. Hey I got tired of freaking pricking my fingers
and you know, doing it probably too much more than I should but I just got tired
of it. I saw a commercial, that’s common commercial BBC and CNN and there then
I went to my general practitioner and said, hey I want to do one of these,
he said, you don’t have diabetes? I said yeah but let me follow up on
everybody with it and here’s the prescription, mark himself out. And that
has been really instrumental in terms of experimenting the different kind of
foods to see how that impacts me directly and to keep that one glucose
level below 12; and I’ve got a job in now. I know exactly what I can eat. I know
what I can’t eat and I know I’ll pay a price. An example, I – did a pie
once a week and now I did eat sushi and I’ll get salmon, sashimi and it comes
in the combo. It comes with a small piece of the sushi, probably less than 1/4 cup
of rice and I would eat those 2 pieces of sushi and bam and I’ll get me back up if
I didn’t eat those things, I just think the fish in the small side salad. You know my
blood sugar might go to 1.15, 1.18. I’m ot over 1 point – but if I eat those 2 small pieces of sushi, it’s gone. It’s 140+
so I’ve learned – (Dr. Brewer:) You said, the difference is the rice? (Chuck:) It’s the rice, it’s the rice,
and there’s also – there’s a dipping of sushi which is small than a white
rice so which I only eat about maybe – I think I – maybe a quarter so not – not
a lot at all and maybe 1/4 cup, maybe a little bit over a quarter cup of white rice
again a lot and I just I just can’t do it. So now that I know I can’t do that, I
don’t do that. This goes a little bit of tweet as we talked about last weekend.
You know I’m looking about where can I tweet to do stuff and I think you know
somebody who lives insulin, you need to wear one all the time,
probably not. They would actually benefit you to wear one for a couple of weeks to
see what should – is impacting their health and how do you make sure that
you’re going to the problem. Yes we can do the finger stick. Right you don’t know
if you’re grabbing a key, right? Maybe either side your teeth could be 30%
higher than what you’re measuring and you’ll never know it but I think the
people are doing so smart. Even though you know if you can argue about the
calibration of it, if it helps answer that, better than by happy.
(Dr. Brewer:) That’s very true! You um – you’re – you’re the first person that I’ve met that’s
already been doing CGM with Dexcom and you mentioned calibration. One of the
major focus points and frustration points,
people expect every reading of every lab to be exactly correct. We had a lot of
discussion about that this weekend where I will classically see a fasting glucose
that’s drawn and the same – same – same sample of blood is also used in a
fasting glucose for an OGTT and it’s routinely turned off and that is that the
reference lab. People get very frustrated with the libre because they say, oh it’s
at least 10 off all the time and I don’t know what to do with it. Had a lot of
discussion about that. With a Dexcom, you don’t have quite that much issue. There’s
a – there’s an option for calibration. Can you mention how you do that? (Chuck:) Yeah it does
have a calibration feature where you can take a bigger break, read the number, pull
up the calibrate mode on your phone and just enter in whatever you’re glucose meter
tells you and that we calibrate it. I found I need to recalibrate it at least once
once a day. It’s what I’m doing right now and probably go once every two days but
it does require you know, you want that active. You really want the accuracy in
the neck but somebody like me doesn’t matter that much probably not on just
looking at trim. Like it is an issue and I think that’s one positive that
calibrate… (Dr. Brewer:) Yeah and of course the negative on the Dexcom is there’s so
much more expensive. Now but at the end of the day, it’s exactly what you were
saying and it’s exactly what one of the the – the attendees of the conference said.
She said I haven’t – I haven’t found that video yet but she said there’s a YouTube
video where someone has a libre patch on this arm, a libre patch on this arm and
throughout the day, keeps going through the patch. Every time there’s at least 10
off, this one’s always 10 higher than this one. But he wakes up in the
morning and sure enough he had a – he had a low point at
3:00, 4:00, or 5:00 in the morning and it starts coming out. It’s something for
breakfast. It goes up, they both go up and so they’re just doing this lockstep all
day. The other thing that, what that does is as you said, and as Jenny rules said,
you are able to eat – the closer. You know what’s going to cause problems and
changes in your blood sugar so you’re now in a much better mode of control
than you ever work. Thank you so much for sharing this Chuck! Do you have anything else
you wanted to share with the viewers? (Chuck:) Yeah, I think the only 2 other thoughts.
One other thing is stress reduction. That was the last component of what I wanted
to get addressed and that’s the last enough about really struggling it, it’s
how to get rid of stress. We’ve chatted about it a little bit. I always sort of
thought medication is sort of far out there but I will tell you this. Started
meditating about a month ago and this two 15-minute session today and I need a
present called a Ziva medicine. I’m telling you, I have experienced some
fairly significant improvements in my overall health and the fact that I get
us much and I have much more focus so getting in, you know I’m on a company so
I got 50. I got 50 some-odd employees. It’s stressful and there’s nothing you
can do to get out of that stress and you don’t have to actually know that you’re
under stress if you are under stress and that’s one thing you gotta address. you gotta
eventually. You’ve got to get that stress off either gotta back off the
work that you gotta come up with a bit about why. I haven’t perfected that yet
but I’m fine. (Dr. Brewer:) So if I could again because there was a little bit fuzzy for
a second there. It sounded like you said medicating for stress. But you said yeah
and it sounded you thought it sounded a little bit out there but then you
started doing it. You got a – a nap – (Chuck:) It’s called
Ziva. The idea that Emily Fletcher has started it and I picked it up on…
podcast and I bought it. It’s a football package and – and – and I tried
it and and I gotta tell you, it worked for me. I got work very light. (Dr. Brewer:) Thank you for sharing that. (Chuck:) I
guess the only last thing you know as you said at the meeting, there’s no
doubt I’m pretty supposed to make genetically happy funny issues but
genetics loads we’ve done and you pull the trigger. I’m all ready to pull the
trigger once. I don’t really want to pull it twice and I have folks telingl me you know,
hey now why are you doing this? You’ve got the kinetics. It is what it is. Do
what you do. I think there’s more to it than that if you say it’s just not that
something. (Dr. Brewer:) Yeah. There’s a lot. I mean you could go two very different directions
at this point in your life Chuck and you know it; and it’s – it’s frustrating to see
the folks that that don’t agree and just think, you know what I got to keep BMI up
over 30 because that’s just the way life is and I’m not gonna change the way I
eat. It’s not worth it. I can’t be happy unless I can eat what I’m eating now and that is
not true. (Chuck:) Yeah well Thank you Dr. Brewer for what you did man. You’ve made a huge impact in
my life. Thank you. Just all the information you
put out there. It made an impact in my life. I’m sure it made an impact in the
others. (Dr. Brewer:) I appreciate that Chuck and by far the major impact has been
what you’ve done. I appreciate you doing what you’ve done. That’s a legacy thing
for me. Anything else for the – for the viewers? I guess the only thing else
maybe yeah – you’ve got cardiovascular disease or
you’ve had disease or your family has a history of cardiovascular
disease and you’re – you’re concerned or worried or you know, whatever may be the
case is something about it. A lot of information out there on the web and
there’s plenty of books and stuff Dr. Brewer has in his channel. Fantastic basic
story and – and make an impact. You can change the outcome. If I had to do it all
over again. I’m convinced I could keep it from her. (Dr. Brewer:) I am too. Thank you for that
message and thank you for the time that and the experiences you’ve shared Chuck.
It was at this point that Chuck and I realized we forgot to talk about his
CI-MT. He was in an interesting category there as well. He didn’t show plaque and
his arterial age was younger than his biological age. Now that’s unusual. There
are a couple of possibilities there. One is and, the one that Chuck thought about
was maybe he reversed it all. It is possible to reverse plaque. You know
I’ve done them with myself. Usually if you’re gonna reverse plaque it tends to
be though fairly young plaque and that’s unusual when you do.
Another possibility with Chuck was that he – he was one of these
unusual people that maybe had a little bit of plaque in coronary arteries but
didn’t have it in carotids. Now that’s a possibility but again
that’s far less than 5%. I tend to lean towards the ladder because he
shared with me that the docs told him, they couldn’t really find plaque
anywhere else except this one area of his – his widowmaker, his LED. But we’ll talk
about that in the rest of this video. So one thing we we didn’t talk about was
your CI-MT Chuck. You know, tell us a little bit about what you saw there. (Chuck:) Oh
yeah what – what an experience that was. That was one of the – one of the reasons
for going to this office. I think in Orlando which yeah MMP and I did the…
Dr. Brewer was. I was apprehensive about taking it because I didn’t want to
ask the question if I don’t want to go to answer and how would we only took the
test on a Friday night and then we got results on Sunday morning and I gotta be
honest with you. I didn’t sleep very good Saturday night and on Sunday morning,
baby was passing out for the folks like the professor in college you know,
passing out the quiz back and I’m like this is either gonna be a really bad day or
it’s going to be a good day. I got the results and outcome. I looked at it and I
couldn’t believe what I saw under the plaque party which is for the one zone.
That’s where everybody goes to me, said, none. (Dr. Brewer:) What was your arterial age? (Chuck:) My arterial age was 10 years younger than my
chronological and needless to say it was – it was an emotional event. It was like
this journey that I’ve been on for – going on 3 years now. At least
was going in a positive direction then going downhill and so it was – it was – it
was pretty cool and at the same time you know there was a lot of guys there
didn’t get babies right. So on a heart sort of went out to them but same time,
time encouraging so hey guys look you haven’t had an event yet so this is – this
is the blessing you know you’ve got . You know it maybe- it’s not the best news you
want but guess what, you learned a whole lot this weekend in terms of how
to go take that the other way. (Dr. Brewer:) That was funny. I was – I was having a very
different experience as I shared with you. Usually I’ll tell crowds don’t go
there in terms of the mean-max, the total plaque burden, all of that stuff that
first section on – on the CI-MT because it’s so confusing and sometimes so scary.
The youtubers there knew so much about what was going on. I decided to take the
risk and was sweating and stammering through all that. Meanwhile as you
mentioned it was not just emotional for you. These – there were what 2 dozen
people there who were getting their their results back. Janice mentioned to
me she said, yeah I’m um she said that’s why I said please ask Chuck what’s going
on because she said she looked over there and she looked like she said you
look like Snoopy doing the happy dance. (Chuck:) Yeah I think Dawson my leg. I was so
happy it was awesome and then I asked you the question you know, hey a pen
party of a species before and I’ll do a CI MT. It says I have no plaque. What’s
the probability that I possibly reversed it and came back and said I might better.
(Dr. Brewer:) Yeah so I think again I think you’re in in really good shape given what what I
see on your CI-MT. I think you’ve done some very very good work. I appreciate
you sharing that with – with the viewers. Talk to you later! Thanks and if you hit
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