Women and Heart Disease

Women and Heart Disease

August 18, 2019 0 By Bertrand Dibbert


(shrill beeping) – The American Heart Association forecasts that almost one in three women will die of heart disease or stroke, whereas one in thirty-three women is estimated to die of breast cancer. Dr. Rachel Sosland from HCA Midwest Health is an expert on heart disease, working with patients at
Centerpoint Medical Center and Menorah Medical Center. Thanks so much for being here. – Absolutely, thank you for having me. – What are some of the signs that you are actually
having a heart attack, because it’s different for men and women? – Right, and I think that’s something that we need to remember, that sometimes we think of
it just being chest pain, pressure, and tightness, but women, it may not be the case. We may get pain not only in our chest but it may be our neck and our jaw. Sometimes it’s arm pain. Sometimes we feel short of breath, either at rest or with exertion. Or it might be very different symptoms, such as dizziness or lightheadedness, nausea or even vomiting, sometimes hot sweats or cold sweats, or even exercise-intolerance. – Wow. – Yeah, so if things you
used to think were easy to do and they become harder for you, it’s important to consult
with your healthcare provider. – I was going to say, at what point, if you’re experiencing
any of those symptoms, do you pick up the
phone or what do you do? – Any concerning symptoms
or a change from normal, you should go right to the ER. Otherwise, consult with
your healthcare provider. – Talk about some of the risk factors when it comes to women and heart disease. – So some of the risk
factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, being overweight, physical inactivity, and actually being a female
over 55 years in itself puts us at greater risk of
developing heart disease. – [Host] Oh wow. – [Dr. Sosland] It’s also
really important to remember our family history plays a role, so if you have first-degree
female relative who developed heart disease at less than 65 years of age, that can also put you at greater risk. – [Host] Wow, so really,
how we live matters, how we’re living our life. What are some lifestyle modifications that we should all be making? – So that’s a great question. So things we can do to
help improve our life is if you smoke, it’s really
important to stop smoking. Smoking in itself causes clots
to form in the blood vessels. It also increases plaque
formation in your arteries. It lowers your good cholesterol. It’s important to be physically active, so control your weight. Just by being 30 pounds overweight or more puts you at greater risk of heart disease, even with no other risk factors. – And I think it’s so interesting that we always hear about breast cancer but we don’t often hear about
heart disease with women. – 80% of heart attacks
are actually preventable with risk factor reduction
and lifestyle modifications. It’s important to, if you’re diabetic or have high blood
pressure, high cholesterol, take medications. It’s important to eat
a heart-healthy diet, which consists of fish, low-fat meats, nonfat or lowfat dairy products,
more vegetables and fruits. And it’s important to empower yourself and your friends to exercise. It’s important to exercise
at least 30 minutes most days a week to
improve your heart health. – Most days a week, so not
like three days a week. – The more, the better.
– Okay. (laughing) Some great tips for us. Thank you so much, Dr. Sosland. Such an important topic for
all those women out there. And you can actually
take a free heart disease risk assessment online. You go to HCAMidwest.com. Click on services for heart care.